2016-2018 plan summary

Expand all

Name

Role

Email

Access


Kornelia Overom
Assistant Principal
KRydberg@cps.edu
Has access

Susan Yates
English Chair
sechinnock@cps.edu
Has access

Dennis Miller
Math Chair
dkmiller@cps.edu
Has access

Vanessa Summer
Science Chair
vvickers@cps.edu
Has access

Wade Littlejohn
Social Science Chair
wwlittlejohn@cps.edu
Has access

Lydia Maldonado
Counseling Chair
lmaldonado@cps.edu
Has access

Andrew Pollak
Attendance Dean
apollak@cps.edu
Has access

Eilleen Treacy
Bilingual Coordinator
ettreacy@cps.edu
Has access

Nellie Hopmann
SPED Chair
cwalsh@cps.edu
Has access

Terry Smith
LSC Chair (parent)
terrysmith2612@gmail.com
Has access

Michael Goodman
Dean of Student Supports/Post Secondary Coach
magoodman1@cps.edu
Has access

Keleyssa Block
FOT/PLP Counselor
kmblock@cps.edu
Has access

Marlita Ingram
Senior Seminar Counselor
mingram@cps.edu
Has access

Audrey Phelan
Art Chair/PPC Member
arphelan@cps.edu
Has access

Tomas Herrera-Myvett
Dean of Students/LSC Rep/PPLC Member
thmyvett@cps.edu
Has access

Jenny Ackerman
Dean of Students/Wellness Champion
jlackerman@cps.edu
Has access

Debbie Alongi
Business Manager
dmalongi@cps.edu
Has access

Kathy Loomos Ostry
School Psychologist
kaloomos@cps.edu
Has access

Irma Cornier
LSC Community Rep
irmacornier@gmail.com
Has access

Date

Participants

Topic


01/11/2016
Principal and ISI Coordinator
Network Expectations and New CIWP Platform

04/05/2016
Principal, Chief, Network Team
Network 3 Timeline and CIWP Process

04/11/2016
Principal, AP, ILT, BLT
Foreman CIWP Timeline and Process

04/27/2016
LSC
Foreman CIWP and Budget Timeline and Process

04/25/2016
Principal, AP, ILT, BLT
Review SEF and Set Ratings

04/28/2016
Principal, PPLC
Review CIWP Timeline and Process, SEF Ratings

05/09/2016
Principal, ILT
Review progress on Strategy and Action steps; set additional sub-committee meetings

05/10/2016
Yates, Littlejohn, Summer, Miller, Overom, Zimmerman
Finalized 1st draft of SAT growth/attainment strategy and action steps

05/11/2016
Ingram, Mares, Overom, Zimmerman
Finalized 1st draft of College Enrollment/Persistence strategy and action steps

05/11/2016
Zimmerman, Chilous
Network 3 touch-base on CIWP progress

05/16/2016
Rink, Block, Handelman, P. and R. Rodriguez, Mac Arthur, Overom, Zimmerman
Finalize 1st draft of FOT/SOT strategy and action steps

05/17/2016
Phelan, Maldonado, Ackerman, Overom, Zimmerman
Finalize 1st draft of 4-year graduation strategy and action steps

04/27/2016
Pollak, Hopmann, Rollins, Herrera, Overom, and Zimmerman
Finalized 1st draft of attendance/1-year drop out rate strategy and action steps

05/25/2016
LSC
Discussed first draft, accessing ciwp.cps.edu, and SQRP goals

06/06/2016
All Foreman Staff Members
Teachers and staff have opportunities to review the draft and provide feedback and ask questions

Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement (4 of 4 complete)     Expand all

Leadership & Collective Responsibility:

Leadership & Collective Responsibility is characterized by an unwavering commitment to fulfilling a shared vision of success. There is a clear focus and high expectations for staff and students, motivating the entire school community to continue striving for success for every student.

Where to look for evidence

Five Essentials: Foreman has rated "well-organized for improvement" for three consecutive years on the Five Essentials survey (5 of 5 SQRP points). There has been a consistent vision for improvement using the MTSS model, and that vision is communicated by the principal and shared among the entire school community: we believe that all students can achieve at the post-secondary level. For Tier 1 behavioral expectations, we have been a PBIS school for 9 years and align all policies and behavioral expectations to the basic idea of "respect". Both the number and severity of behavioral infractions have decreased over time with the systematic support of our PBIS. For Tier 1 academic expectations, we have been a Curriculum Framework Project school for 6 years, and teachers work in course teams to develop common CCSS-aligned unit maps, formative, and summative assessments for four bands of each course (self-contained, prep/inclusion, regular, and honors/pre-AP/AP). Despite increases in the number of students enrolling at Foreman as "graduated with supports" from elementary school, we've achieved four consecutive years of ACT composite growth (setting school records over the last two years) and increased the % of students achieving 20+ from 7% to 22%. Teachers see a high level of program coherence (rating it "very strong") with consistency in implementation and allocation of resources over time. Teachers also rate school leadership as "strong" and find many opportunities to collaborate to support student achievement (rating Foreman "strong" in collaboration). The principal has maintained a consistent vision for Foreman and supports teacher teams in regularly using data to inform practice and make adjustments to our systems. The Behavioral Leadership Team makes decisions about PBIS implementation, and the Instructional Leadership Team makes decisions around the Curriculum Framework Project.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Leadership & Collective Responsibility

  • Set the direction and create a sense of purpose by building consensus on and implementing a shared vision.
    • Consider the demographics of the school community in developing a shared vision.
    • Help stakeholders understand the relationship between the school’s vision and their initiatives and priorities.
    • Consistently use informal and formal opportunities to champion and articulate the vision.
    • Act in ways that consistently reflect the school’s core values, beliefs, and priorities in order to establish trust.
    • Ensure the school’s identity, vision, and mission drive school decisions.
  • Inspire a culture of collective responsibility for the success of ALL students in the whole school (not solely teacher’s own students).
  • Empower others to make or influence significant decisions.
    • Build shared leadership structures and opportunities for job-embedded leadership training and development.
    • Capitalize on the leadership skills of others.
    • Constantly listen and synthesize what is heard, and learn from all sources.
  • Employ the skills to effectively manage change.
    • Master skills associated with large-scale strategic planning processes and implementation of such plans.
    • Steer through the challenges associated with making improvements, both large and small.
  • Create and sustain a coherent instructional program (coordinated and consistent) with learning goals.
  • Use the CPS Framework for Teaching to ground instructional guidance and coaching.
    • Model ambitious goals for teaching and learning for all students, including priority groups.
    • Draw from the best available evidence to inform instructional improvement decisions.
  • Enable staff to focus and prioritize what matters most.
    • Buffer staff from external distractions to the school’s priorities and goals.
    • Limit school improvement goals to a few high leverage activities.
    • Prioritize teaching challenging content, engaging students in learning, rigor and ways to raise achievement.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Instructional Leadership Team:

The ILT is characterized by having a consistent structure for teacher leadership that is focused on creating and implementing the theories of action that improve teaching and learning. ILT meetings are a productive forum to identify challenges, collect and review evidence, exchange ideas, and propose and implement solutions to challenges to school improvement.

Where to look for evidence

At Foreman, the ILT and the BLT are teacher teams who drive school improvement in academics and behavior (respectively). The ILT is comprised of department chairs who guide the work of course teams to develop common CCSS-aligned unit maps, formative, and summative assessments. The ILT regularly looks at school-wide student data to make necessary adjustment in academic systems. All members of the ILT received extensive training as part of the Curriculum Framework Project in the development of standards-aligned curriculum and formative/summative assessments. The ILT will focus on CCSS and preparing students for success on our new academic measure, SAT. Department chairs communicate with course teams, which regularly look at student-level data to make necessary adjustments to curriculum, instruction, and assessments. The BLT is comprised of counselors, deans, social work, and school psychologist. The BLT regularly looks at school-wide student data to make necessary adjustments to behavioral systems. The MTSS intervention team regularly looks at student-level data to determine Tier 2 and Tier 3 academic, behavioral, and SEL interventions. All teams set agendas, record minutes, and determine action items and owners. All teacher teams operate under the MTSS model to enact the school's vision of preparing all students for post-secondary success. The ILTs leadership in the vertical alignment of courses has provided 37% of Foreman students with Early College Attainment (4 out of 5 on the SQRP). The BLTs leadership in school-wide support of restorative practices has allowed the our OSS and ISS numbers to decrease and has reduced the recidivism rate for all students making it unlikely that students who have a level 4, 5, or 6 infraction will have repeated high level infractions.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Instructional Leadership Team

  • Engage in on-going inquiry (e.g. continuous improvement cycles) as a basis for improvement.
    • Gain productive insight and take substantial new action or adjust strategy that clearly addresses root causes.
    • Relentlessly ask, “Is it working?” about every program, initiative, and strategy in the school.
    • Vet Initiatives and strategies on the basis of their direct or proven impact on outcomes.
    • Monitor if previous actions were implemented (fidelity) and working as intended. Ask, "If not, why not?"
  • Share leadership for improving teaching and learning with representative school members.
    • Organize the team around a common understanding of team’s purpose and instructional priorities.
    • Represent all relevant specialty content areas, programs, related services, and grade bands/department teams and is an appropriate size.
    • Represent a balance of work styles (e.g. task-oriented, provides push-back, synthesizes, etc.)
  • Use protocols and ask probing questions.
    • Ask questions focused on factors within sphere of control and avoid a focus on student factors.
    • Use appropriate protocols and level of analysis (grade, school-wide, individuals) for meeting purpose.
    • Systematically consider root cause(s) based on thorough review of evidence.
  • Use timely and relevant data/evidence sources.
    • Gather and use current and relevant local student, school, teacher performance (e.g. attendance data, assessment results), and operational data formatively to review and revise school and classroom practices as needed.
    • Disaggregate data for priority student groups (e.g. English learners, diverse learners).
  • Schedule and structure frequent meetings.
    • Meet regularly (2-4 times per month).
    • Use an agenda with a clear focus.
  • Collaborate effectively, value transparency, and inform and engage stakeholders.
    • All team members have equity of voice and are actively engaged in asking questions.
    • Celebrate small wins and improvements.
    • Regularly inform and engage stakeholders of key data and work of the ILT.
  • Build the capacity of teacher teams to lead cycles of learning and problem solving focused on student learning data and student work.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Professional Learning:

Professional Learning includes sufficient time, support, and ‘safe practice’ space to internalize new knowledge to change practice and beliefs. Adults persevere in collaboration with their colleagues to innovate and improve implementation of new practices.

Where to look for evidence

Teachers are scheduled with common prep periods for monthly department meetings and weekly course team meetings. Course teams align common curriculum and formative/summative assessments to CCSS and NGSS, collect student assessment data, analyze results,and make instructional adjustments based on data. Departments ensure vertical alignments, especially around agreed-upon writing strategies (MEL-Con, DBQ...). Teachers also have one professional development period per week (small group meetings) in which they receive training around MTSS, writing across the curriculum, vertical alignment, REACH, special populations, and least restrictive environment. In SY16, teachers received training on DOK levels in assessment development, differentiating instruction (creating guides for each band of every course), serving special populations, the impact of trauma on achievement, the MTSS referral process, and creating Least Restrictive Environment. In SY17, teachers will focus on grading practices, continuing alignment of unit maps to CCSS and SAT, unpacking SAT standards/expectations, and using assessment data to inform practice. On the SY16 5 Essentials survey, teachers rated FCCA's professional learning as "very strong" (94%). 93% of teachers agreed that school leadership "presses teachers to implement what they have learned in professional development." In SY17, FCCA's ILT will select a target area for instructional rounds to further open practice and focus on key professional learning initiatives.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Professional Learning

  • Select and design professional learning (PL) to achieve school-wide improvement, including closing priority group achievement gaps.
    • Use data to identify performance and practice gaps to inform PL plan.
    • Use research about best practices to identify potential learning and subject matter experts to support.
    • Solicit feedback from staff to inform selection of PL opportunities.
    • Provide PL relevant to the cultural and linguistic needs of students.
    • Provide both whole staff and differentiated PL to individual teacher levels.
  • Implement and sustain on-going, job-embedded professional learning (PL) (e.g. coaching, peer learning opportunities, action research)
    • Recommend and/or provide PL opportunities directly related to individuals’ specific areas of need and professional growth goals.
    • Encourage staff to broaden networks to bring new knowledge and resources to learning environment.
    • Teachers initiate opportunities for professional growth and proactively seek opportunities to enhance content knowledge and pedagogical skill.
  • Structure time for teachers to collaborate and learn together. 
    • Create schedules and systems to conduct peer observations, and coaching. Reflect on its impact.
    • Teachers provide and accept collegial support and feedback to/from colleagues.
    • Teachers participate in and facilitate professional inquiry in teams to advance student learning.
  • Make ‘safe practice’ an integral part of professional learning.
    • Allow teachers ample time to try new strategies, refine skills, grapple with implementation problems, and share knowledge and experience.
    • Provide support that addresses the specific challenges of changing classroom practice. Provide coaching/mentoring support to validate continuing to work through struggles.
  • Monitor implementation to ensure staff uses new knowledge to improve practice and it is having the desired effect on practice and student outcomes.
    • Conduct frequent non-REACH observations to provide coaching and actionable feedback.
  • Provide induction and support for new teachers.
    • Assign each new teacher a mentor who is skilled in pedagogy and is an open, collaborative colleague.
    • Schedule a series of ‘learning experiences’ for new teachers that helps them navigate important initiatives (e.g. REACH) and provides information on school specific goals and resources.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Aligned Resources:

Resources (e.g. time, budget, staff, and community resources) are aligned to school priorities. Improving achievement guides resource allocation. Making the most of student time and staffing is a priority. The school organizes resources school-wide through schedules and staffing plans that target additional time and individual attention to those students who need it most and to highest priority subject areas.

Where to look for evidence

Staffing is allocated around Foreman's MTSS goals with the majority of staff members supporting Tier 1 academic and behavioral supports. A smaller number of staff members support Tier 2 and 3 interventions, including supports for diverse and English language learners. All students receiving intervention are tracked and monitored in our FCCA-created database by the MTSS intervention team so that tier 2 and 3 resources are provided to those students most in need. Teachers will be programmed in SY17 to have course team, department, and grade-level planning time during the school day to work on curriculum, instruction, and assessment design. Resources are also allocated for the intervention referral system (Verify Logger). Foreman actively seeks grant-funded external partners to augment supports for students and will continue partnership in SY17 with GEAR UP, CASA, Upward Bound, One Goal, BAM, WOW, Alternatives (RJ), HAS (substance abuse), SOAR, Youth Guidance, Teen Parenting and internally-provided supports (ThinkFirst, CBITS, DIMES, one to one counseling). In the areas of both "effective leaders" and "collaborative teachers", teachers rated FCCA as "strong."

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Aligned Resources

  • Design a school day that is responsive to student needs.
    • Use CPS Instructional Time Guidelines to maximize instructional time.
    • Use CPS Instructional Block Guidelines to maximize academic-engaged time.
  • Align the budget to the CIWP priorities and the mission of the school.
    • Avoid overemphasis on the purchase of products/programs that are not research based or do not respond to SEF needs.
    • Leverage strategic source vendors to maximize dollars.
    • Seek and obtain grants to support articulated needs.
    • Use grant funds strategically to support areas of highest need.
    • Maximize the use of supplemental funding to close any priority group achievement gaps.
  • Streamline purchase procedures to minimize lapses between ordering and receiving materials.
  • Evaluate, to the extent possible, the consequences for student learning of resource allocation decisions to develop an evidence base of outcomes of particular uses of resources.
  • Have a ‘hiring team’ and collaborative hiring process with clear selection criteria to identify and select best available candidates.
    • Actively work to build a pool of potential staff members, particularly difficult to fill positions (e.g. staff to serve English learners).
    • Use an interview process including a protocol for questioning and select highly qualified candidates.
    • Require a classroom lesson demonstration to assess candidate expertise, philosophy and commitment.
    • Check teachers’ previous performance at CPS schools.
  • Strategically assign teachers to grade and content areas to create a balanced team with a variety of strengths.
    • Ensure all students have fair access to high-quality teachers in the school.
  • Effectively utilize Related Service Providers at the classroom level.
  • Use data including teacher evaluations and exit interviews to inform a retention strategy.
    • Create a positive climate and working conditions for teaching that attracts and retains educator talent.
    • Create opportunities for growth including opportunities for staff to assume additional leadership roles or pursue personal growth goals.
    • Track retention rates over time and use this information to isolate staffing strengths and identify opportunities to improve.
    • Solicit information from staff using exit interviews/surveys to understand reasons for leaving school or district.
  • Make outreach efforts to engage community members as partners and resources.
  • Partner with one or more organizations that share the values of the school and have a complementary mission to the school’s vision.
    • Monitor the impact of partner organizations’ activity.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning (4 of 4 complete)     Expand all

Curriculum:

The curriculum – what students should know and be able to do - makes standards come alive for students. All students have access to an academically rigorous curriculum that inspires students to think and contribute high quality work to authentic audiences beyond the classroom. The curriculum fully integrates academic and social emotional learning opportunities for all students, including diverse learners, English learners, and advanced learners. The school regularly examines the curriculum to check alignment to standards and opportunities for all students to meet those standards.

Where to look for evidence

Foreman is a Curriculum Framework Project school and is in year 7 of implementation. While CFP began with intentional alignment to College Readiness Standards (ACT), FCCA teachers have been working over the last four years to align curriculum and assessments to CCSS and NGSS. The other components of CFP remain in place: banded classes, double period supports for English I and II and Algebra I, common course team curriculum and assessments, and use of MEL-Con for expository writing. Teachers are organized into course teams in which they design common CCSS/NGSS-aligned curriculum, instructional activities, and assessments. Each course has an honors/AP, regular, prep/inclusion, and self-contained band so that curriculum is differentiated for groups of learners. For students needing significant reading support, they are programmed into either Wilson or Rewards reading intervention courses. Courses are also vertically aligned with departments having common planning time; AP capstone courses and/or dual credit courses have been identified, and departments have backward-designed course sequencing. FCCA also offers a 4-year JROTC sequence and two technology-based CTE programs. As a result of CFP, AP, dual credit, JROTC, and CTE, FCCA has seen four years of solid growth in student ACT scores, and approximately 40% of graduates have earn early college attainment.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Curriculum

  • Adhere to the CPS Content Frameworks (MathScienceSocial Science, and Literacy) to ensure alignment of scope and text and task complexity.
    • Provide a range and depth to knowledge and understanding of learning experiences that are language and content rich.
  • Align units of instruction (horizontally/vertically) to scope and sequence maps and pace units and lessons appropriately.
    • Focus so units can be adequately addressed in the time available.
    • Examine formative data to determine mastery and pace. Discuss how much time it takes to adequately address the essential elements, and the viability of documents that articulate essential content and timing of delivery (e.g. pacing guides, curriculum maps).
  • Utilize the ‘big ideas’ that should be taught to determine whether students are being taught the body of knowledge, the understandings and the skills expected.
    • Identify the essential understandings – what students should learn in greater depth. In other words, know ‘covering everything but learning nothing’ does not work.
  • Expose and extend opportunities for all students to grade appropriate levels of text complexity in all types of texts, including informational in all content areas.
    • Articulate language goals that are separate from and support content goals. Literacy - reading, writing and speaking are essential ‘learning tools’ across the curriculum (disciplinary literacy).
  • Engage all learners in content areas by fully integrating opportunities for all learners, including:
    • Diverse learners to demonstrate core knowledge and skills.
    • English Learners to develop academic language to demonstrate mastery.
      • Use English and native language development in addition to content standards to differentiate for English learners.
      • Understand research and implement programs to develop native language literacy for English learners.
    • Advanced learners to extend core knowledge and skills.
  • Distinguish qualitatively and quantitatively between ‘regular courses’ and ‘advanced courses’ (e.g.  AP, gifted, etc.)
  • Integrate academic and social emotional learning.
  • Reach outside of the classroom for real world (or simulated) application. For example,
    • Incorporate web capabilities for interactivity and information sharing.
    • Integrate field-based learning through partnerships with city institutions (e.g. museums), colleges, universities, and community based organizations.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Instructional Materials:

Materials to present learning content and what the learner uses to demonstrate are characterized by variability and flexibility. Materials are identified and adapted to increase access to learning for all students. Materials include multimedia and embedded, just-in-time supports; varied tools and supports; alternative pathways, and varied levels of support and challenge. (adapted from UDL Guidelines 2.0)

Where to look for evidence

FCCA has expanded the number of computer labs and computer-based classrooms over the last five years so that all students have access to technology for instructional purposes. Consumer Ed utilizes EverFi; our math intervention is ALEKS; Read About is a reading intervention program; credit recovery will be offered using Aventa (or other Board-approved online resources); teachers with classroom-based technology utilize Google classroom and electronic portfolios. All classrooms have Elmos and projectors. Course teams identify all instructional materials in April of the prior school year so that materials can be ordered and received prior to the start of the new school year. Course teams have aligned all curriculum and assessments to both CRS and CCSS; science is in the process of adding NGSS components to every unit. Course teams also developed differentiation guides specific to each band of every course so that teachers have a menu of best practices in differentiation to reference in planning for instruction. Teacher teams agree on core content and focus skills for each band of every course; within each band, then, teachers identify supporting texts and tasks that are differentiated to support student learning (including Diverse Learners and English Language Learners). On the 5 Essentials survey for SY16, students rated FCCA teachers "strong" on "expectations for postsecondary education" and "strong" on "ambitious instruction," moving up from "neutral" in SY15.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Instructional Materials

Instructional materials (including technology) are…..

  • Aligned to curricular plans and expectations of the standards.
  • Varied and flexible.
    • Are selected and adapted based on learning objectives and learner needs.
    • Include a variety of quality media, manipulatives and supplies to achieve valued learning outcomes.
  • Intentionally planned by identifying or adapting appropriate tools (including technology) for specific instructional needs.
    • Student outcomes and developmental appropriateness determine when and who will use the materials.
    • Materials are updated/upgraded in response to new information and understandings.
  • Equitably available and accessible to all teachers and students.
    • Teachers and students have available a variety of high quality, standards-aligned instructional materials and resources.
    • Materials are in English and native language for English learners.
    • Reference and resource materials are readily available and circulated throughout the school.
  • Include multimedia and embedded, just-in-time supports (e.g. hyperlinked glossaries, background information, and on-screen coaching) – for conveying conceptual knowledge.
    • Students interact with instructional materials to engage all modalities in the learning process.
    • Technology is integral to students learning experiences.
    • Units and lessons include grade-appropriate levels of texts and other materials so every student can access the content/skills.
  • Include tools and supports needed to access, analyze, organize, synthesize, and demonstrate understanding in varied ways – for learning and expression of knowledge.
    • The needs of the students at different performance levels are met by using a variety of instructional materials that allow students to draw on all of their learning capacities.
    • The teacher models effective use of various materials.
    • Students understand that materials are a means to acquire language, knowledge, and competencies.
    • Technology enhances students’ higher order, creative thinking and problem solving.
    • Materials connect subject area content to real life applications.
  • Include alternative pathways including choice of content, varied levels of support and challenge, and options for recruiting and sustaining interest and motivation – for engaging and learning.
    • Students make choices about instructional materials as part of learning.
    • Materials address the needs of the total child: cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, physical, and aesthetic.
    • Consumables are often non-print supplies that promote active, hands-on learning.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Rigorous Student Tasks:

The school regularly examines student work - what students are being asked to do on in their classrooms - across grades or courses in all content areas. Examining the texts and tasks students experience provides the necessary insight to gauge rigor and illuminate how the standards are actualized prompting the question whether or not approaches support the true spirit of college and career readiness. (adapted from The Education Trust – Equity in Motion Series)

Where to look for evidence

Students have access to appropriately rigorous texts and tasks in all classrooms. All teachers have been trained in research writing (our Targeted Instructional Area for the last 5 years has been writing and research writing), and each course has a designated writing element to drive student thinking and rigor. As part of research writing, students engage in developing questions, finding sources, evaluating sources, synthesizing information, organizing information, and presenting findings in written and oral platforms. In addition, each department has a scaffolded writing focus: English uses MEL-Con, social science uses DBQ, science uses science labs, and math uses double entry journals. Course teams meet weekly to review common assessments and instructional activities; teachers determine mastery and next steps for re-teaching in course teams. When disaggregating ACT data, FCCA students in honors/AP levels show the most growth; regular and prep/inclusion level students still struggle with improving academic outcomes. On the 5 Essentials survey for SY16, students rated FCCA teachers "strong" on "expectations for postsecondary education" and "strong" on "ambitious instruction," moving up from "neutral" in SY15. In SY15, nearly 40% of FCCA graduates had completed Early College Attainment, indicating a high percentage of students being successful in the most rigorous courses offered.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Rigorous Student Tasks

  • Begin with the belief that all students can learn. (see Culture for Learning)
    • Convey high learning expectations for all students and develop structures that enable practice and perseverance for each individual student.
    • Create an environment where students assume responsibility for high-quality work by persevering, initiating improvements, addressing critiques, making revisions, adding detail and/or helping peers.
    • Communicate the necessity of attendance and engagement everyday in order to succeed.
  • Plan and assign tasks that are cognitively challenging for individual students and require students to provide evidence of their reasoning.
    • Align tasks with standards-based learning objectives that reflect the depth of knowledge expectations.
    • Tasks are Integrative to draw on multiple standards.
    • Teach for Robust Understanding in Mathematics (TRU Math). Engage students with important mathematical ideas, not simply receiving knowledge, requiring students to engage in productive struggle.
  • Tasks reflect the key shifts in literacy.
    • Complexity: Tasks reward close reading of complex text; Focus on comprehension of academic language, not obscure vocabulary.
    • Evidence: Cite evidence from text and write to sources, not decontextualized prompts.
    • Knowledge (non-fiction): Tasks embed reading and writing across disciplines with a variety of literary and informational complex texts and tasks and demonstrate comprehension through speaking, listening.
  • Tasks reflect the key shifts in mathematics.
    • Focus: Tasks reflect a curricular and instructional focus on the major work in (e.g. operational fluency and number sense in K-2).
    • Coherence: Multi-grade progressions stress key beginnings (e.g. ratios in 6th grade) and key end points (e.g. fluency with multiplication in 3rd);
    • Rigor: Problems require construction of mathematical reasoning and critiques of other possible solutions.
  • Provide opportunities for students to create authentic work for real audiences (beyond the teacher) to motivate them to meet standards and engage in critique and revision.
  • Examine student work to identify and showcase the qualities of strategic thinking that are both rich in content and relevant for students.
    • Analyze models with students to build a vision of quality.
    • Use protocols to collectively reflect regularly on the level of cognitive demand asked of students across the school, particularly priority group students, to think strategically as speakers, listeners, readers, and writers.
    • Analyze student work samples as part of professional learning to best support students’ attainment of quality work and standards.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Transitions, College & Career Access & Persistence:

The school creates pathways to success built on a vision in which all students leave secondary school with a clear plan for their initial postsecondary destination, whether in apprenticeship training, work, or college. All students have equal access to college preparatory curriculum to be successful.  The school is characterized by structures for developing early postsecondary awareness and the knowledge and skills that lay the foundation for the academic rigor and social development necessary for college and career success. Students are equipped with the confidence in their ability to implement and adapt their plan throughout their lives as they and the world around them change. This vision sees students as the architects of their own lives.(adapted from Creating Pathways to Success, Ontario)

Where to look for evidence

Foreman creates a post-secondary culture in several ways. First, there is a four-sequence of seminar classes that focus on post-secondary preparation. Seminar I, which is attached to English I, provides all freshman with lessons on transitioning to high and making the most of the high school experience; once monthly, freshmen go to the post-secondary lab to work on their Individual Learning Plans. Seminar II, which is attached to English II, provides all sophomores with lessons on post-secondary opportunities, building a strong college application, and AVID-like skills to manage high school coursework; sophomores go to the post-secondary lab monthly to work on their individual learning plans. Seminar III, which will be supported through a One Goal grant in SY17-SY19, provides all juniors with SAT preparation as well as college application and financial aid lessons; all juniors write personal statements, complete a draft FAFSA, and the common college application. Seminar IV, which is taken by 2/3 of seniors, provides them with a weekly visit to the post-secondary lab to complete their senior post-secondary goals: college exploration and application, resume writing, FAFSA and scholarship completion, and graduation requirement tracking. In addition to the seminar series, FCCA students have after school access to the post-secondary lab, go on GEAR UP sponsored college visits and college fairs, have access to Visionaries (an extracurricular support for Dreamers), and have access to four Early College Attainment programs (AP, Dual Credit, CTE, and JROTC). FCCA has seen an improvement in graduation rates and will see improvement in College Enrollment and Persistence. Almost 40% of graduates of FCCA have early college attainment. Despite the post-secondary plan, FCCA students still struggle with College Enrollment and Persistence. In the SY16 5 Essentials survey, however, students indicated growth in their perception of a postsecondary focus at Foreman and see Foreman as "preparation for the future" (with 89% of students agreeing and strong agreeing).

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Transitions, College & Career Access & Persistence

  • TRANSITIONS - Have structures and processes in place to ensure successful transitions (e.g. into school , grade to grade, school to school, school to post-secondary).
    • Mitigate the adverse effects experienced by some students in transition – such as arriving part-way through the school year – that can cause students to fall behind or become disengaged from school.
    • Monitor the progress of English learners after transition from services.
    • Provide programs and interventions that help students as they move from middle school through Freshmen year, including but not limited to:  High School Investigation Days, Freshmen Connection program (where budget allows), and a robust Freshmen Orientation program. Implement targeted holistic student supports the entire Freshmen year.
    • Provide sustained summer learning experiences to minimize learning loss and support key transition periods (e.g. summers before Kindergarten, HS, and college).
      • Use student data and best practices research to develop focused programs.
      • Expand access beyond students who are struggling academically.
      • Provide school counseling and postsecondary advising transition support and follow-up during “Summer Melt” and the first year of college.
    • AWARENESS - Expose students early to academic/professional worlds beyond K-12.
      • Provide students opportunities to discover personal talents and skills, identify career interests, and pursue coursework/activities necessary to reach personal, academic and career goals.
      • Expose students to a range of career paths and the educational requirements of each to improve long-term planning and goal-setting.
      • Start the conversation about college in primary grades.
      • Make parents aware of academic opportunities and supports for their child.
    • READINESS – Ensure equitable access to college preparatory curriculum.
      • Provide access to 8th Grade Algebra to all eligible 8th grade students.
      • Provide access to early college and career coursework and credential opportunities while in HS (e.g. AP credit, Dual credit, industry credentials (CTE), Seal of Biliteracy)
      • Teach students to analyze their transcripts and test scores, as well as connect course selection, attendance, and grades to their continued success and access to postsecondary options, and adjust their actions and behavior to make progress toward graduation and their top postsecondary choice. Provide support and motivation to encourage B’s or better and improving attendance.
      • Create opportunities for students to explore college and career knowledge, mindsets, and skills necessary for academic planning and goal setting.
      • Find opportunities to work with all students on academic and personal behaviors, including persistence, engagement, work habits/organization, communication/ collaboration, and self-regulation.
      • In Naviance, develop an Individual Learning Plan that tracks coursework, college and career assessments, goal setting, 6th-12th grade milestones completion that culminates in a concrete postsecondary plan.
    • SUCCESS - Provide direct assistance to all students and families through every stage of the college selection, application, and entry process (Transition to College (HS)) including, but not limited to academic planning/advising to assist with:
      • Selecting colleges with the best institutional graduation rates for their level of qualifications. (Students of all qualification levels are more likely to graduate from college if they attend a postsecondary institution with high graduation rates
      • Researching/comparing options including short and long-term financial outcomes, comparing college graduation rates, and other statistics to narrow down options.
      • Researching living wage options such as an apprenticeship or certification programs for students who wish to work after high school and/or want to delay college.
      • Applying to multiple colleges—generally three or more.
      • Navigating financial aid and capitalizing on grant and scholarship opportunities.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Expectations for depth & breadth of Quality Teaching (3 of 3 complete)     Expand all

Instruction:

The teachers have finely honed instructional skills. They can shift from one approach to another as the situation demands by carefully monitoring the effect of their teaching on student learning. They seamlessly incorporate ideas and concepts from other parts of the curriculum into their explanations and activities. Their questions probe student thinking and serve to extend understanding. They promote the emergence of self-directed learners.

Where to look for evidence

All teachers have been trained through the Curriculum Framework Project to create 4 banded versions of each course: honors/AP, regular, prep/inclusion and self-contained. In course teams, teachers have created recommended strategies for differentiating instruction at each banded level of each course. Course teams meet weekly to review student work and make mid-course adjustments on instruction. Course teams also have developed common CCSS-aligned curriculum and assessments for all courses. Teachers use the data from common assessments to ensure student mastery and adjust instruction. As a results of targeted, responsive instruction, FCCA has seen four consecutive years of growth on our ACT attainment; the last two years, FCCA has set new records for high ACT composite scores. In addition, vertically aligned courses lead students to early college attainment in AP, dual credit, CTE, and JROTC courses with nearly 40% of graduates attaining early college credit. Teachers have received training on development of questions to drive instruction, writing to capture student learning, and differentiating supports for individual learners. Students have rated English instruction more favorably over the last four years in the 5 Essentials survey (growing from 44% agreeing that English instruction is "ambitious" to 56% agreeing, though this is still a neutral rating). In math instruction, students agree at a 66% rate that math instruction is "ambitious", which is "strong." Overall, though, students viewed Foreman's "academic press over time" as "strong" with 64% of students agreeing that teachers expect students to meet academic standards (per the SY16 5 Essentials survey). In addition, students have rated the "quality of student discussion", which is driven by teacher questioning, as "strong" with a 75% agreement rate, which is up from 20% in SY13.

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Scoring guide

Guide for Instruction

  • Plan a range of effective pedagogical approaches suitable to student learning of the content/skills taught and anticipate student misconceptions.
  • Effectively communicate with students.
    • Guide students to articulate the relevance of the objective(s) to learning.
    • Anticipate possible student misunderstanding.
    • Enable students to develop a conceptual understanding of content while making connections to their interests, knowledge, and experience.
    • Enable students to contribute to extending the content by explaining concepts to their classmates.
    • Build on students' language development and understanding of content.
    • Use vocabulary appropriately for students' ages and development. Students contribute to the correct use of academic vocabulary.
  • Use questioning and discussion as techniques to deepen student understanding and challenge.
    • Use a variety of low- and high-level, open-ended, and developmentally appropriate questions to challenge students cognitively, advance high level thinking and discourse, and promote metacognition.
    • Use techniques that enable students to engage each other in authentic discussions about content. And, enable students to formulate their own questions and respectfully challenge one another using viable arguments based on evidence.
    • Encourage student responsibility for ensuring all voices are heard in the discourse and that all students are listening and responding to questions and answers from their teacher and peers.
    • Require students to cite textual evidence to support/develop a claim.
  • Engage students in learning.
    • Scaffold instruction to ensure all students, including diverse learners and English Learners, access complex texts and engage in complex tasks.
    • Provide targeted supports to individual students or groups of students based on their identified needs.
    • Provide instruction designed to develop language domains for English learners.
  • Monitor the effect of teaching on student learning and integrate formative assessment into instruction.
    • Monitor progress and check for understanding for individual students.
    • Change instructional practice based on analysis of current data.
    • Use universally designed assessments that allow for multiple pathways for students to demonstrate understanding of the objective(s.
    • Also see Balanced Assessment.
  • Persist in adjusting instruction so individual student misunderstandings or advanced needs are successfully accommodated.
    • Intervene in a timely and effective way to help students who are struggling.
    • When formative assessments show a need for intervention or enrichment, make effective impromptu adjustments that individualize instruction.
    • Use progress monitoring data to trace effectiveness of interventions and student response to intervention.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Multi-Tiered System of Support:

The school is characterized by full implementation a system of academic and social emotional (SEL) supports for all students. Every day, in all classrooms, all teachers provide: Universal instruction in the core curriculum - academic & SEL (Tier 1) to all students; additional targeted academic and SEL supports (Tier 2) where needed; and deep and intense supports (Tier 3) based on individual and small group needs. The school also monitors On Track data (grades/GPA and attendance (ES), and course credits (HS)) to provide interventions/supports for students at risk for failure and/or truancy.

Where to look for evidence

Foreman has a strong Tier 1 approach to academics (Curriculum Framework Project) and behavior (Respect -- PBIS). FCCA also has a robust system for referals for intervention for academic, behavioral, and social emotional needs of students. The MTSS intervention team maintains a Google-based intervention tracker that includes progress monitoring. Teachers use Verify Logger to refer students for intervention; counselors receive the intervention requests and complete an intake within 48 hours of receipt; counselors recommend interventions for students or bring the student name to the MTSS intervention team to create a Problem Solving Team. Interventions at FCCA include: Becoming a Man, Working on Womanhood, HAS, Alternatives, Knock at Midnight, Teen Parenting Support, SOAR, ThinkFirst, CBITS, DIMES, Rewards, Wilson, ALEKS, student mentors, after school tutoring, and one to one counseling. FOT and SOT track individual student grades to ensure students remain on track. Teachers also monitor classroom-level interventions for attendance, grades, and behavior in 5-week Google-based F Reports. More than 40% of FCCA students are receiving an individualized intervention plan. With a strong MTSS in place, FCCA has seen four consecutive years of growth in our attendance rate as well as a lowering in the number of level 4, 5, and 6 disciplinary infractions. Through the restorative practices components of MTSS, FCCA has reduced the recidivism rate for misbehavior to near 0. The FOT and SOT teams also review student data to provide specific and targeted interventions to freshmen and sophomores. All Summer Acceleration freshmen were screened over the summer prior to entry, and each student began the year with a personalized learning plan that is progress monitored every 5 weeks. The result of the intervention work with FOT and SOT has been significant improvement in both rates; FCCA is on target to improve FOT from SY15 to SY16 by 10%. The SOT rate is now close to 70%, which is up from 62% in SY15.

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Scoring guide

Guide for Multi-Tiered System of Support

  • TIER 1 - Persist in adjusting instruction so individual student misunderstandings or advanced needs are successfully accommodated. (3e)
    • Intervene in a timely and effective way to help students who are struggling.
    • When formative assessments show a need for intervention or enrichment, teachers make effective impromptu adjustments that individualize instruction for students.
    • Use progress monitoring data to trace effectiveness of interventions and student response to intervention.
  • TIER 1 - Customize the learning environment, pace, and approach of teaching and curriculum in order to meet each learners’ individual needs (‘Personalized Learning’).
    • Empower student to advance their learning.
    • Use up-to-date individual student profiles that include strengths, needs, motivations, and outlines an individualized path to reach his/her goals.
    • Classrooms are student-centered with student agency.
    • Each student has the opportunity to advance upon demonstrating mastery.
  • ON TRACK - Provide universal supports to prevent failing and absenteeism and targeted interventions for grades below “C” or chronic absenteeism. (On Track)
    • Identify students off track due to low attendance and poor course performance and provide intensive supports to address root causes of why students have low grades and poor attendance.
  • TIER 2 & 3 - Collaborate and work as teams of teachers and Related Service Providers (RSP) to plan and monitor targeted student support with varied instructional strategies and SEL support of varying degrees of intensity for all students.
    • Monitor students requiring and receiving targeted and intensive instruction/interventions.
    • Use the Problem Solving Process to plan Tier 2 and 3 instruction/interventions.
    • Determine appropriate interventions for students or groups of students not making adequate progress.
    • Use progress monitoring data to track effectiveness of interventions and student response to intervention.
  • TIER 2 & 3 – Implement Personal Learning Plans (PLP) goals and intervention strategies for students requiring school year supports as described in Elementary School Promotion Policy (Board Report 09-1028-PO2). 
    • Ensure implementation of these plans, review subsequent 5 week data, determine the effectiveness of the strategies and adjust plans as needed.
  • Communicate to parents/guardians the additional supports and/or interventions provided for their child to better align school and home environments.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Balanced Assessment & Grading:

A balanced assessment system effectively measures the depth and breadth of student learning and monitors student progress towards college and career readiness. It also produces actionable data to inform planning for instruction, academic supports, and resource allocation. To meet these goals, a balanced assessment system must include multiple measures and be responsive to the needs of all students, including diverse learners and English learners.

Where to look for evidence

Course teams have developed common CCSS-aligned curriculum and assessments. Assessments are both formative and summative and include MC, short response, and long essay. All bands of courses use the same core curriculum and assessment system with all students, including DLs and ELs. The core curriculum and assessments are modified for the specific course bands: honors/AP, regular, prep/inclusion, and self-contained. In SY16, FCCA began reflecting on grading practices and policies. A grading sub-committee of the ILT has made recommendations to improve the % of students passing classes. Each department, too, has agree upon grading categories and policies to improve consistency in student assessment. This is an area for future growth and will be measured with improvements in FOT, SOT and 4-year graduation rate. The current core pass rate is 60%; in response to this low rate, teachers have been completing Google form "F Reports" to indicate exactly which students are failing, what is causing the failing grade, and what classroom interventions have been implemented; administration is checking report fidelity and analyzing results for trends to inform grading practice revision in SY17.

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Scoring guide

Guide for Balanced Assessment & Grading

  • Use multiple measures (i.e. a range of assessment types and at multiple points in time) to supplement district-centralized assessments with other formative assessments to provide a more comprehensive picture of student learning.
  • Use screening, diagnostic, and progress monitoring assessment to correctly identify specific gaps and monitor improvement, especially for students receiving Tier 2 and 3 services, in addition to Tier 1 core instruction. (also see MTSS and Instruction)
  • Make assessments accessible to students, including diverse learners and English Learners through employing features of universal design and use of accommodations and, where needed, modifications.
    • Provide accommodations in presentation (i.e. how assessment text and tasks are presented to students), response (i.e. how students provide their answers), and/or setting/timing (i.e. scheduling/location of assessment).
  • Utilize assessments that reflect the key shifts in literacy and mathematics in teacher created or selected assessments. (see Rigorous Student Tasks)
  • Utilize assessments that measure the development of academic language for English learners.
  • Have access to and analyze school-wide, teacher team, and classroom assessment data to determine instructional effectiveness and subsequent learning needs
  • Improve and promote assessment literacy.
    • Work together on building common assessments within a department, course, or grade level team.
    • Invest resources in helping teachers evaluate and improve the quality of formative assessments. For example, use the Assessment Design Toolkit.
    • Use common protocols and calibrate on scoring and grading in teacher teams.
    • Analyze quality and alignment of assessments and tasks to ensure they meet the expectations of the standards and embed various levels of complexity.
  • Have a grading system that clearly, accurately, consistently, and fairly communicates learning progress and achievement to students, families, postsecondary institutions, and prospective employers.
    • Ensure that students, families, teachers, counselors, advisors, and support specialists have the detailed information they need to make important decisions about a student’s education.
    • Measure, report, and document student progress and proficiency:
      • Against a set of clearly defined cross-curricular and content-area standards and learning objectives collaboratively developed with staff.
      • Separately from work habits, character traits, and behaviors, so that educators, counselors, advisors, and support specialists can accurately determine the difference between learning needs and behavioral or work-habit needs. academic mindsets and behaviors (CCSR).
    • Ensure consistency and fairness in the assessment of learning, and assignment of scores and proficiency levels against the same learning standards, across students, teachers, assessments, learning experiences, content areas, and time.
    • Ensure grades are not used as a form of punishment, control, or compliance.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life (6 of 6 complete)     Expand all

Culture for Learning:

A culture for learning is characterized by a school atmosphere that reflects the educational importance of the work undertaken by both students and staff. It describes the norms that govern the interactions among individuals about the mindsets (e.g. ability/confidence to grow with effort), academic behaviors (e.g. attending classes, completing assignments), the learning strategies and skills, the value of perseverance despite challenges and obstacles, and the general tone of the school. The classroom is characterized by high cognitive energy, by a sense that what is happening there is important, and that it is essential to “get it right.” There are high expectations for all students. The classroom is a place where teachers and students value learning and hard work, and students take visible delight in accomplishing their work. Staff believe they can make a difference, that their hard work is the fundamental cause of student achievement, and are invested in student outcomes.

Where to look for evidence

Foreman has embraced a culture for learning that begins with student behaviors. The FCCA PBIS embraced by all stakeholders is "respect yourself, respect others, and respect the school environment." Because we prioritize learning, Foreman hallways are clear of students; there is a robust hall sweep policy to ensure that students are in the classroom and learning. In the classroom, teachers utilize common CCSS-aligned curriculum and assessments to provide rigorous instruction for students. Courses are vertically aligned so that students progress as quickly as they are able to early college coursework: AP, dual credit, CTE, and JROTC. Teachers recommend students for diagonal movement between bands at the 5, 10, and semester mark. The result of the emphasis on placing students into the most challenging academic setting is an increase in the number of sections of honors/AP at each grade level with seniors having the most offerings for AP and dual credit. Almost 40% of FCCA graduates have early college attainment. Areas for improvement in Culture to Learning include Freshman and Sophomore On Track rates, where FCCA is building out a comprehensive system of support to improve the pass rates for all students, with a particular focus on grades 9 and 10. Another area for improvement is SAT growth for the regular and prep level students; in SY15 22% of FCCA students achieved 20+ on the ACT, but most were in honors/pre-AP classes. According to the 5 Essentials survey in SY16, 64% of students share a high level of trust with teachers, which is a "strong" rating.

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Scoring guide

Guide for Culture for Learning

  • Create a culture that reflects a shared belief in the importance of learning and hard work.
    • Use strategies to reinforce and cultivate student curiosity.
    • Make learning goals relevant to students, and inspire students to stay committed to their learning goals.
    • Consistently communicate the expectation that all students can achieve at high levels.
    • Utilize strategies to encourage daily and timely attendance.
  • Convey high learning expectations for all students and develop structures that enable practice and perseverance for each individual student.
    • Clearly display school-wide expectations for academic and personal success throughout the building.
    • Set high expectations according to grade-appropriate learning objectives.
    • Differentiate expectations so all students stretch to not only meet but exceed personal learning goals.
    • Recognize high levels of student achievement. All students receive recognition.
    • Encourage student resilience and hard work.
    • Ensure students feel safe to share misunderstandings and struggles.
  • Encourage students to take ownership and pride in their work where students assume responsibility for high-quality work by persevering, initiating improvements, addressing critiques, making revisions, adding detail and/or helping peers.
    • Students self-assess (e.g. checking own work before giving to teacher) to develop a reflective habit of mind essential for improvement. This ensures students take responsibility for their own learning, focuses attention on criteria for success, and increases effort and persistence.
  • Provide students frequent, informative feedback.
    • Tell/show students what they have done well (through positive reinforcement) and what they need to do to improve, including clarifying criteria and goals.
    • Give feedback on the task, the processes used to complete the task, and on the student’s ability to self-regulate their own learning.
  • Develop academic mindsets and behaviors.
    • Teach a growth mindset that over time with effort and practice, students can learn and succeed.
    • Encourage students’ sense of belonging to the school and classroom community (see Relational Trust).
    • Employ strategies including ongoing monitoring and support of students’ academic behaviors.
    • Praise effort and process. For example, “Good job, that must have taken a lot of effort” instead of, “Good job. You must be really smart.”

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Relational Trust:

The school is characterized by high levels of relational trust between all school participants - the “glue” or the essential element that coordinates and supports the processes essential to effective school improvement. Interactions, both between the teacher and students and among students, are highly respectful, reflecting genuine warmth and caring. Students contribute to high levels of civility. Interactions are sensitive to students as individuals, appropriate to the ages and development of individual students, and to the context of the class. The net result of interactions is that of academic and personal connections among students and adults.

Where to look for evidence

Teacher to administrator trust is "very strong", and teacher to teacher trust is "strong", according to the 5 Essentials Survey for SY16. Teachers create strong relationships with students, in most FCCA classrooms teachers rate proficient or distinguished in "respect and rapport." According to the 5 Essentials survey in SY16, 64% of students share a high level of trust with teachers, which is a "strong" rating. Students receive opportunities through the seminar course sequence to develop Individualized Learning Plans and through MTSS students receive targeted and tiered supports. Student attendance, an indicator of relational trust, has improved each of the last four school years. All teachers utilize the PBIS, Respect Yourself/Others/School Environment to set baseline expectations for classroom behavior. Misbehavior is down school-wide as are repeated infractions; deans and teachers utilize restorative practices to create an environment that is sensitive to individual student needs. Adults provide strategic mentorship for the most "at risk" students through MTSS, FOT, and SOT work; external providers also provide a variety of SEL supports to the approximate 40% of students receiving them.

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Guide for Relational Trust

  • Develop trusting relationships with students so each student has at least one trusted adult in the school.
    • Adults are responsible for occasional check-ins or serve as mentors.
  • Adult-student interactions are positive, caring, and respectful.
    • Ensure a greater proportion of interactions are positive (as opposed to corrective) between staff and student consistently school-wide.
  • Student interactions are mutually supportive and respectful, with strong norms for positive behavior.
    • Create opportunities for students to build positive relationships with peers.
    • Create opportunities for older students to mentor younger students.
  • Understand diversity and its impact on student learning; recognize and integrate the learning opportunities that come from a diverse community.
    • Create opportunities for students to learn about the community they serve (e.g. culture and neighborhoods).
    • Have mutual respect for individual differences (e.g. gender, race, culture, etc.) at all levels of the school—student-student; adult-student; adult-adult and overall norms for tolerance.
    • Provide training to engage diverse families and communities.
  • Support and respect one another, personally and professionally (Teacher-Teacher Trust, Teacher-Principal Trust)
    • Respect other teachers who take the lead in school improvement efforts.
    • Respect colleagues who are experts at their craft.
    • Exchanges are marked by genuinely listening to what each person has to say and by taking these views into account in subsequent actions. Even when people disagree, individuals can still feel valued if others respect their opinions.
    • Personal regard springs from a collective willingness to extend beyond the formal requirements of a job definition or a union contract (e.g. openness or reaching out to others).
  • Utilize relationships as a means of deterring truant behavior brought on by unspoken hurdles a child may be facing.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Student Voice, Engagement, & Civic Life:

Students are interested and engaged in learning, invested in their school, and contributing to their community. The school provides early and ongoing exposure to a wide range of extracurricular activities and rigorous courses and programming.

Where to look for evidence

FCCA students are involved in interscholastic sports, Academic Decathlon, many clubs/activities, and JROTC-sponsored events. Increasingly, through strategic efforts in counseling, students are applying for enrichment opportunities in leadership and academics sponsored by area universities and colleges. There are two student leadership committees that advise on school issues: senior and junior class officers. Students engage in rigorous academics as well as evidenced by the large number of AP, dual credit, CTE, and JROTC students in early college attainment programs. Foreman also has provided student voice to the district with an FCCA student being selected to participate on the CEdO Student Advisory Board. GEAR UP and One Goal also provide students with opportunities to attend college fairs and visit college campuses. BAM and WOW sponsor activities to support SEL growth among their students, such as intramural sports activities, weekend retreats, and targeted field trips. On the 5 Essentials survey, students indicate strong student to teacher trust and strong expectations for post secondary education. After school, students have opportunities to engage in athletics, the arts, science, and tutoring through a number of partners including the National Museum of Mexican Art, CASA, GEAR UP, After School Matters, and CPS interscholastic athletics.

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Scoring guide

Guide for Student Voice, Engagement, & Civic Life

Students…

  • Have equitable access to a wide range of extracurricular and enrichment opportunities that build leadership, nurture talents and interests, and increase attendance and engagement with the school.
    • Student needs, interest, and input are solicited for student programming.
    • Impact and quality of extracurricular and enrichment activities are measured regularly.
  • Have equitable access to rigorous courses/programming (e.g. AP, IB, magnet, dual credit, CTE).
    • Student needs, interest, and input are solicited for student programming.
  • Have a choice.
    • Respectful student questioning and inquiry is embraced. Students choose issues of concern, research topics relevant to their lives, and develop their own plans to address them.
    • Learning activities are personalized to match students’ needs and interests, and students are involved in decisions that affect their learning.
  • Have a voice and take informed action.
    • Students are included in key conversations about their learning experience and work with the principal and staff to identify issues and implement solutions. (e.g. student voice committee).
    • Students initiate and lead some school improvement initiatives.
    • Students participate in democratic decision-making at the school level.
    • Students identify and research issues of relevance and work together to propose/advocate for solutions.
  • Connect to decision-makers.
    • Students learn about the structures and roles of government and civil society. They learn how to engage with elected officials and decision makers, and learn they have power and practice using it.
    • Students learn about issues and candidates, prepare voter education materials and get involved. 
    • All eligible students are asked to register to vote.
  • Make positive contributions to the school and community.
    • Civic engagement is the project of entire school. Teachers and school staff collaborate across disciplines and grade levels to align and embed civic skills and content in curriculum.
    • Curriculum based projects, including service learning experiences, are present in various disciplines, and link students to community resources and partners.
    • Incorporate writing for audience beyond the teacher (presentation based learning).
  • Learn to evaluate and consider multiple viewpoints by discussing current and controversial topics.
  • Consider how people in a democratic society effect change.
  • Consider their roles and responsibilities as a member of the community.
  • In high school, students are enrolled in Civics courses.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Safety & Order:

The school is characterized by high levels of safety and order. Students feel physically and emotionally safe from harm, and adults work to actively maintain a safe, orderly school environment.

Where to look for evidence

FCCA has made great strides in improving school safety over the last several years. Overall, violent infractions are down significantly, out of school suspensions have been greatly reduced, restorative practices have been embedded in all disciplinary conversations, and the rate of recidivism is extremely low, particularly for female students. Through a grant opportunity with Communities United, FCCA administration explored areas of discipline discrepancy and identified two areas for growth: among male students and among Black students. The Behavioral Leadership Team is identifying strategies to improve metrics among those targeted populations, the first of which is an initiative called Calm Classroom, which will be piloted in Spring 2016 with full implementation in SY17. A strategic and consistent hall sweep method keeps hallways clear and students in classrooms. Safe Passage outside of school property, particularly CTA buses, remains an issue. Only 2% of students indicate that they feel unsafe in FCCA classrooms, compared to 10% who feel unsafe outside the school or travelling between home and school.

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Guide for Safety & Order

  • Ensure students and adults feel physically, socially, intellectually, and emotionally safe throughout the school.
  • Provide clear procedures for reporting and responding to safety concerns.
  • Manage efficient and orderly transitions between activities.
    • Manage classroom routines and procedures to maximize instructional time.
    • Orchestrate the environment so students contribute to the management of classroom routines (e.g. transitions) without disruption of learning).
    • Arrival, dismissal, and other school-wide transitions are safe, efficient, and orderly.
  • Provide a framework for positive behavior throughout the school based on shared values and expectations.
    • Have shared expectations for positive behavior. (See Restorative Approaches to Discipline)
  • Teach, model, and reinforce (by all staff members) clear behavior expectations for all areas of the school.
    • All adults use active supervision (move, scan, and interact) in all settings.
  • Emphasize proactive, instructive, and restorative approaches to student behavior and minimize punitive consequences through policies and procedures. (See Restorative Approaches to Discipline)
    • Adults correct misbehavior in ways that reinforce established expectations and cause minimal disruption to learning.
  • Clarify criteria for office referrals versus classroom managed behavior.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Restorative Approaches to Discipline:

The school is characterized by having and implementing policies and procedures that emphasize proactive, instructive, and restorative approaches minimizing punitive consequences. Discipline practices primarily focus on shaping behavior as opposed to punishing behavior. The school only uses out-of-school suspension as a last resort and utilizes a systems-change approach to bring about a more restorative culture. The school is also characterized by strong and consistent school and classroom climates. The school reinforces positive behaviors and responds to misbehaviors in calm, respectful, and thoughtful ways, teaching students important social and emotional skills that enable them to get along with others, make responsible decisions, and focus on learning.  When misbehavior occurs, the school seeks to understand the underlying reasons (root cause) in order to design a response that effectively changes student behavior using a menu of instructive, corrective and restorative responses.

Where to look for evidence

Foreman is in its 6th year of implementation of restorative practices. Out of school suspensions have been greatly reduced, and restorative practices are the preferred method of handling disciplinary issues. Deans, teachers, and all staff members have been trained in restorative practices and regularly implement them. FCCA partners with Alternatives to coach teachers who still struggle with implementation of restorative practices in the classroom. Deans regularly have restorative conversations and peace circles to get to root cause analysis of misbehavior. Students participate in restoration through the Peer Conferencing. Restorative practices extend to the MTSS intervention team and teacher referrals for intervention. Consistent use of restorative practice has increased student to teacher trust to "strong." All teachers have undergone training in restorative practices with Umoja, and targeted teachers have received additional support from Alternatives.

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Guide for Restorative Approaches to Discipline

  • PROACTIVE - Reinforce positive student behavior with clear expectations, routines, and procedures.
    • A team meets regularly to organize systems that support a restorative environment.
    • Post and refer to clear, positively stated expectations and model expected behaviors.
    • Create routines and procedures central to the learning environment.
    • Engage families as partners.
    • Contact families frequently to inform them of positive student behavior and progress.
    • Vary acknowledgements and provide both short and long term opportunities for reinforcement for all students.
  • INSTRUCTIVE - Integrate universal SEL skills instruction and core content.
    • Intentionally teach competencies outlined in SEL Standards. Use discipline as opportunity to teach these skills.
    • Use a Multi-tiered System of Supports (MTSS) for social, emotional, and behavioral growth.
      • Use data to determine which behaviors should be retaught or more heavily reinforced.
    • Explicitly teach expected behavior and positively reinforce consistently school-wide.
    • Avoid power struggles with students by offering choices. Redirect students privately and respectfully.
  • RESTORATIVE - Employ a continuum of responses to behavior to effectively change student behavior.
    • Ensure classroom instruction continues when problem behavior occurs.
    • Prefer responses that do not remove students from regular instructional setting or after school activities.
    • Respond to behavior to address the cause, reteach expectations, build social emotional skills, and repair relationships with staff or peers.
    • Designate an administrator, such as a dean or restorative practices coordinator, responsible for leading centrally-managed response to behaviors using consistent, restorative procedures.
    • Support teachers to engage in restorative conversations or respond to behavior incidents.
    • Provide opportunities for students to take responsibility for repairing harm caused by their actions.
    • Assign detention and ISS only for students who have a pattern of misbehavior and have not responded to non-exclusionary interventions, or when separation is a logical response to the behavior.
      • Include specific interventions to address social and emotional skill development, communicate with teachers to repair relationships, maintain classroom work, and connect to behavioral intervention services as necessary.
      • Establish a clear procedure for obtaining assignments from teachers to mitigate the impact of lost instruction for students assigned to ISS.
      • Designate space and consistent staff to support implementation of ISS.
    • (Optional) Develop a Behavioral Health Team to coordinate appropriate behavioral interventions.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Parent Partnership:

The school develops strong parent partnerships characterized by involving parents in the instructional program, messaging expectations, fostering a better connection between the school and home, and inspiring participation and high levels of collaboration with families. The school provides opportunities for families to volunteer, build its parent community, and support the school's operations through activities including but not limited to participation on parent councils (e.g. PACs, BACs and PLNs). There are high levels of communication between schools and families is mutual and two-way. Families have a way to voice concerns and schools address and respond to input.

Where to look for evidence

Perhaps the most outstanding growth at FCCA in the past 5 years has been in parent partnership. FCCA has a dedicated parent room (equipped with technology, print resources, and phones). FCCA, GEAR UP, CASA, and Youth Guidance partner to offer parent workshops (several times per month), parent ESL classes, parent art classes, parent technology classes, English and Spanish book clubs, and parent post-secondary support. Active parents regularly reach out to other FCCA parents to encourage participation in school events. In SY15 and SY16, there were only 3 active parents on the LSC; in SY17, there are a full 6 parents (with 9 on the ballot). The PAC meets monthly as does the BAC. Teachers also regularly reach out to parents via phone, e-mail, and text; the FCCA policy is for a teacher to reach out to a parent every 5 weeks, if the student is failing or endanger of failing. On the 5 Essentials survey, parents are viewed as "strong" on their involvement in the school (above the CPS average) and "very strong" on their influence on decision making at the school. Parents are also fully involved in the IEP process for Diverse Learners and the BAC for English Language Learners. All formal parent communications (letters, reports, robo-calls) are made in both English and Spanish. Each office has at least one Spanish speaker to best support our bilingual parents. Undocumented students and their families are supported by a free month CPS Legal clinic and an after school group called "Visionaries" that particularly target undocumented student postsecondary planning.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Parent Partnership

  • Establish a non-threatening, welcoming environment that is warm, inviting, and helpful.
  • Provide frequent, high quality, well publicized opportunities for families and community to participate in authentic and engaging activities in the school community (e.g. student performances/ exhibitions, literacy or math events).
  • Provide multiple opportunities for parents to ask questions, raise concerns, and give feedback.
    • Respond to families’ concerns and requests for information professionally and in a timely manner, providing resources and solutions to address the concerns.
  • Solicit the support and engagement of families as partners in the instructional program (e.g. volunteering, working at home with their child, involvement in class and school projects in and out of school, and parent workshops).
    • Host events for parents to share with other parents how home and school complement each other.
    • Share best practices around learning and development with parents to support students at home.
    • Inform parents of grade level standards and expectations and grading policies with a clear description of what meeting the standard looks like.
    • Inform parents of attendance expectations and the impact of attendance on a student’s trajectory.
    • Assist parents to volunteer in the school and/or participate on teams/committees.
    • Promote the use of Parent Portal and Parent University to connect and engage parents with school.
  • Frequently communicate with families about class and individual activities and individual student’s progress.
    • Regularly inform parents of their child’s progress across all relevant measures: attendance, discipline, academics, social-emotional learning, and health and wellness.
    • Send regular, positive, personalized communication from a staff member.
    • Use a variety of consistent communication methods (e.g. calls, text, newsletter, website, face to face) sensitive to cultural norms and needs.
  • Conduct intensive outreach to families in need of specialized support through home visits and collaboration with social services agencies.
    • School responses to student excessive absences and/or tardiness includes outreach to families.
  • Provide proactive communication (e.g. parent handbook and resources).
  • Partner equitably with parents speaking languages other than English.
    • Information is provided to parents in their native language.
    • Parent meetings scheduled with interpreters present to facilitate participation.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Score

Framework dimension and category

Area of focus = Not of focus

2
Expectations for depth & breadth of Quality Teaching: Balanced Assessment & Grading
2
Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning: Rigorous Student Tasks
2
Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning: Transitions, College & Career Access & Persistence
2
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Culture for Learning
3
Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement: Aligned Resources
3
Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement: Instructional Leadership Team
3
Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement: Leadership & Collective Responsibility
3
Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement: Professional Learning
3
Expectations for depth & breadth of Quality Teaching: Instruction
3
Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning: Curriculum
3
Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning: Instructional Materials
3
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Relational Trust
3
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Restorative Approaches to Discipline
3
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Safety & Order
3
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Student Voice, Engagement, & Civic Life
4
Expectations for depth & breadth of Quality Teaching: Multi-Tiered System of Support
4
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Parent Partnership
2014-2015 Actual
2015-2016 Actual
2015-2016 SQRP Goal
2016-2017 SQRP Goal
2017-2018 SQRP Goal
My Voice, My School 5 Essentials Survey
FCCA will continue to be "Well Organized for Improvement." SY16 results of the 5 Essentials: FCCA went up in all 5 areas, including 4 out 5 "strong" ratings with an overall "Well Organized for Improvement."
National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
As Illinois transitions to SAT, FCCA will achieve 35% expected growth on SAT by SY18. This is a priority metric.
29.00
32.00
35.00
African-American National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
Schools must have 200 students within a priority group to receive a rating for EPAS growth. Because Explore and Plan are no longer offered, FCCA does not have 200 African-American students in our growth data.
3.00
0.00
0.00
Hispanic National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
As Illinois transitions to SAT, FCCA Hispanic students will achieve 35% expected growth on SAT by SY18. Hispanic students make up 80% of FCCA students.
29.00
32.00
35.00
English Learner National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
Schools must have 200 students within a priority group to receive a rating for EPAS growth. Because Explore and Plan are no longer offered, FCCA does not have 200 English Language Learner students in our growth data.
0.00
0.00
Diverse Learner National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
Schools must have 200 students within a priority group to receive a rating for EPAS growth. Because Explore and Plan are no longer offered, FCCA does not have 200 Diverse Learner students in our growth data.
13.00
0.00
0.00
National School Attainment Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
As Illinois transitions to SAT, FCCA will achieve 20% attainment by SY18. This is a priority metric.,
16.00
18.00
20.00
Freshmen On-Track Rate
With intentional, systematic efforts, FOT will improve to 85% by SY18. This is a priority metric.
63.30
60.20
80.00
88.00
4-Year Cohort Graduation Rate
Through implementation of revised grading protocols and through robust student supports, FCCA will achieve 65% graduation rate by SY18. This is a priority metric.
69.40
55.70
62.00
68.00
1-Year Dropout Rate
Through strategic student supports and proper verification of student transfer, FCCA will reduce its 1-year drop out rate to 3% by SY18. This is a priority metric.
0.50
9.70
4.00
3.00
College Enrollment Rate
With a comprehensive post-secondary focus, FCCA will achieve a 55% college enrollment rate by SY18. This is a priority metric.
46.40
40.20
50.00
55.00
College Persistence Rate
With a comprehensive post-secondary focus, FCCA will achieve a 65% college persistence rate by SY18. This is a priority metric.
53.70
52.40
60.00
65.00
Average Daily Attendance Rate
With continued implementation of the attendance plan, FCCA will achieve 90% by SY18. This is a priority metric.
87.80
88.80
89.00
88.00

Custom metrics 0 of 0 complete

2014-2015 Actual
2015-2016 Actual
2015-2016 SQRP Goal
2016-2017 SQRP Goal
2017-2018 SQRP Goal

Tags:
MTSS, Attendance, Drop out rate

Area(s) of focus:
3, 2

Action step

Responsible

Timeframe

Status

Collaborating with Calm Classroom to train staff members and students how to utilize mindful practices daily
Dean and Social Worker
May 10, 2016 to
May 17, 2016
On-Track

MTSS, Attendance, Climate and Culture, Social emotional, Drop out rate, 5 essentials

Identifying overage and under-credited students to refer to SOAR for re-engagement into school
Dean and Counseling Chair
Nov 7, 2016 to
May 31, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, Attendance, Social emotional, At risk, Drop out rate

Comprehensive security plan to ensure safe morning entry and secure hallways
Dean
Sep 5, 2016 to
Jun 16, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, Attendance, Behavior and Safety, Safety and order, 5 essentials

Offering summer, evening, and during school (online) credit recovery for all students who fail required courses
Credit Recovery Coordinator
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Academic, On track, Student achievement, Credit recovery, At risk, 4-year graduation rate

Identifying and offering after school programs for students that are high-interest, relevant, and post-secondarily focused to encourage engagement with the school
Science and Math Chairs, Tech Coordinaor
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Technology, Attendance, Stem, Enrichment, After school matters, Drop out rate, 5 essentials

Acknowledging student growth and achievement at each semester with On Track and Rising Ceremonies
Student Acknowledgement Committee Chair
Jan 27, 2017 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, Attendance, Academic, Incentive, On track, Drop out rate, 5 essentials

Tracking attendance to the individual student: home visits will be made to chronically truant student homes to reengage students; attendance recovery will be input for all after school academic programs; student and parent contact information will continually be updated; parents will receive automatic attendance triggers, if their student is chronically absent/truant
Attendance Clerk
Aug 29, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

Attendance, Anaylze data, Drop out rate, Dqi

Tags:
MTSS, Attendance, Freshman on-track, Grades, Sophomore on track

Area(s) of focus:
2, 4

Action step

Responsible

Timeframe

Status

Before each 10-week grading period ends, students will participate in a synergy day (which is a school-wide opportunity for students to receive packets of missing work and to re-take assessments in order to improve grades -- B or Better)
Freshman and sophomore core course team leads and AP
Nov 4, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

Attendance, Grading, Freshman on-track, Credit recovery, Sophomore on-track, 4 year graduation rate

Adoption of a unified grading policy that strategically weights assessments by grade level and/or department and a no zero policy for any work that is completed; teachers will receive additional support and training to change teacher approach to student grades
ILT and grading sub-committee
Aug 29, 2016 to
Sep 30, 2016
On-Track

Grading, Freshman on-track, Credit recovery, Sophomore on-track, 4 year graduation rate

Off-track students will be identified every 5 weeks and assigned an adult mentor to coach them back to passing by offering academic, behavioral, and SEL support
FOT and SOT committee chairs
Oct 3, 2016 to
May 25, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, Grading, Freshman on-track, Credit recovery, Sophomore on-track, 4 year graduation rate

Identification and screening of at-risk incoming freshmen through summer programs (Summer Acceleration and Freshman Connection) to recommend beginning of school year interventions
Counseling Chair
Jun 27, 2016 to
Jul 22, 2016
On-Track

MTSS, Attendance, Freshman on-track, At risk, Drop out rate, 4 year graduation rate

Common planning time for both course teams and grade-level teams to give teachers opportunity to review student data and student supports/interventions
AP and grade 9/10 core course team leads
Sep 6, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

Freshman on-track, Common planning time, Sat, Sophomore on track, Student data, Curriculum framework project, 4 year graduation rate

Tags:
On track, Graduation, Curriculum framework project, 4 year graduation rate

Area(s) of focus:
4, 2, 5

Action step

Responsible

Timeframe

Status

Student contracts clearly articulate expectations for graduation and are tied to senior participation in senior activities and walking at graduation; contracts and behavioral expectations are communicated to all students during school opening assemblies
Counseling Chair
May 17, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, SEL, On track, 4 year graduation rate

Students receive bi-weekly BAG reports for students and families to track grades, attendance, behavior, and graduation requirements
AP
Sep 13, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

Attendance, Behavior, Grades, Graduation

Create a shared master senior tracker, which identifies all graduation requirements and post-secondary KPIs
Counseling Chair
May 17, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, On track, Fafsa, 4 year graduation rate

Mandated parent meetings at spring Report Card Pick Up for parents to pick up graduation plans (they pick up graduation tickets as an incentive); regular communication with families
Counseling Chair
Apr 13, 2017 to
Apr 13, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, Parental involvement, 4 year graduation rate

Individual counselor meetings with seniors to develop graduation plans in fall and spring; juniors have post-secondary planning in last quarter of their One Goal class
Counseling Chair and One Goal Teacher
Sep 6, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, Fafsa, 4 year graduation rate

Completion of non-credit graduation requirements is embedded in courses and recovery opportunities are provided for students who need them (Consumer Ed, Public Law, and service learning)
Counseling Chair, Service Learning Coordinator, Social Studies Chair, Programmer
Sep 6, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, 4 year graduation rate

Provide entering freshman with opportunity to participate in Freshman Connection, Orientation, and Summer Acceleration in ordering to begin high school transition
Counseling Chair
Jun 27, 2016 to
Jul 22, 2016
On-Track

Post secondary supports, Freshman on-track, 4-year graduation rate, Hs transition

Tags:
Parcc, Differentiation, Rigor, Sat, Curriculum framework project

Area(s) of focus:
1, 2, 4

Action step

Responsible

Timeframe

Status

Providing all juniors with One Goal curriculum that includes SAT prep(Seminar III)
One Goal Coordinator
Sep 6, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, On track, Assessments, Post secondary, Sat, 4 year graduation rate

Providing all freshmen and sophomores with online "No Red Ink" adaptive writing convention program
English Chair
Aug 29, 2016 to
Sep 26, 2016
Not started

MTSS, Parcc, Common core state standards, English, Sat

Providing all freshman (non-SAGA) and seniors (College Algebra) with some pre-AP juniors with ALEKS online adaptive math intervention
Math Chair
Sep 6, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
Not started

MTSS, Math, Parcc, Common core state standards, Sat

Including SAT-like assessment questions and language on course-specific formative and summative assessments
Core Department Chairs
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

Math, Science, Social studies, Common core state standards, English, Sat, Curriculum framework project

Incorporating NGSS science and engineering practices into instructional activities
Science Chair
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

Science instruction, Common core state standards, Sat, Curriculum framework project, Isbe science test

Revising department-adopted writing strategies with a focus on CCSS/NGSS/SAT alignment
Core Department Chairs
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, Math, Science, Social studies, Common core state standards, English, Sat, Curriculum framework project

Differentiating curriculum, instruction, and assessments for each band of courses (honors/AP, regular, prep/inclusion, self-contained)
Core Department, ELL, and DL Chairs
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, Math, Science, Diverse Learners, Social studies, English, English language learners, Curriculum framework project

Collecting and analyzing assessment data (in-class, PSAT, PARCC, and SAT) to determine skills for re-teaching
Core Department Chairs
Sep 5, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, Differentatied instruction, Assessments, Parcc, Sat, Curriculum framework project

Providing math and literacy interventions for identified students (Rewards, Wilson, ALEKS, No Red Ink, Saga)
English, Math, DL, and ELL Chairs
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
Not started

MTSS, Intervention, Parcc, Sat, Curriculum framework project

Tags:
College Access and Persistence, Post secondary supports, Fafsa

Area(s) of focus:
5, 2

Action step

Responsible

Timeframe

Status

4-year seminar sequence to support student post-secondary goals: Seminar I has bi-weekly visits to the post-secondary lab to connect current learning to college preparation; Seminar II has monthly visits to the post-secondary lab (GEAR UP) to create high school plan that links to college and career plans; Seminar III meets daily (One Goal) to support SAT preparation and post-secondary planning; Seminar IV meets weekly in the post-secondary lab to track college and scholarship application progress
Counselors
Sep 6, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, Post secondary supports, 5 essentials, 4 year graduation rate

In-class and after school workshops to prepare students and families for the FAFSA application and scholarship application; post-secondary lab is open after school for facilitated support
Counselors
May 17, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, Parental involvement, Post secondary supports, Fafsa, 5 essentials

Student enrichment committee tracks all enrichment opportunities, creates a monthly bulletin that is communicated to all stakeholders, identifies target students and encourages application, tracks application and participation
Counselors
Sep 6, 2016 to
Aug 31, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, Parental involvement, Post secondary supports, Enrichment

Students are given opportunities for students to visit colleges and universities to see academics and cultural supports; grades 9 and 10 visit colleges for exposure; grades 11 and 12 are targeted visits for particular students; students also are encouraged to visit a second time once they have made college decision
Counselors
Jun 27, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, Post secondary supports, 5 essentials

College and career partners are invited into the school to share resources and opportunities with interested students; FCCA has an annual college and career fair every fall
Counselors
Oct 3, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, Parental involvement, Post secondary supports, 5 essentials

Foreman families are provided a parent resource room with access to post-secondary workshops, parenting classes, ESL classes, technology lessons, art classes, and book clubs (in English and Spanish)
Counseling Chair
Jun 27, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

College Access and Persistence, Parental involvement, Post secondary supports

Targeted students receive 1st year of college supports: diverse learners receive follow up phone interviews to check on post-secondary plans; One Goal classes receive Y3 support throughout their first year of college; GEAR UP will follow the graduating class of 2018
DL and Counseling Chair
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, Diverse Learners, College Access and Persistence, Post secondary supports

Undocumented students are required to complete scholarship applications instead of FAFSA; Visionaries meet after school to support undocumented students and their post-secondary plans; free legal clinics are offered monthly to support students and their families with immigration issues
Visionaries Sponsor and Counselors
Sep 6, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

MTSS, English Learners, College Access and Persistence, Post secondary supports

On-Track

Collaborating with Calm Classroom to train staff members and students how to utilize mindful practices daily"

May 10, 2016 to May 17, 2016 - Dean and Social Worker

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Utilized grant funding to schedule preliminary trainings on May 10th and 17th; this also includes materials
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Identifying overage and under-credited students to refer to SOAR for re-engagement into school"

Nov 07, 2016 to May 31, 2017 - Dean and Counseling Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
MTSS referral system is in place; SOAR representative attends monthly external partner meeting
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Comprehensive security plan to ensure safe morning entry and secure hallways"

Sep 05, 2016 to Jun 16, 2017 - Dean

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
SY16 data indicates fewer misconducts, incidences, and arrests; SY17 security protocol will be reviewed and published in Teacher Handbook
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Offering summer, evening, and during school (online) credit recovery for all students who fail required courses"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Credit Recovery Coordinator

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Students automatically enrolled in credit recovery, which has led to increased number of credits recovered each semester; online credit recovery will be included in master schedule
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Identifying and offering after school programs for students that are high-interest, relevant, and post-secondarily focused to encourage engagement with the school"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Science and Math Chairs, Tech Coordinaor

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
ASM will continue with forensics and digital media; Robotics and Girls Who Code are planned for implementation in SY17; additional extracurricular STEM activities will be identified and implemented
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Acknowledging student growth and achievement at each semester with On Track and Rising Ceremonies"

Jan 27, 2017 to Jun 23, 2017 - Student Acknowledgement Committee Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
SY16 system for identifying students and printing certificates is in place for SY17; hundreds of students are being recognized for their acheivements, growth, and attendance
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Tracking attendance to the individual student: home visits will be made to chronically truant student homes to reengage students; attendance recovery will be input for all after school academic programs; student and parent contact information will continually be updated; parents will receive automatic attendance triggers, if their student is chronically absent/truant"

Aug 29, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Attendance Clerk

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Requesting continued funding of Knock at Midnight to support home visits; two full-time attendance clerks needed to track students, process letters, and input attendance recovery; some elements are budget contingent; attendance grant will fund KAM
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Before each 10-week grading period ends, students will participate in a synergy day (which is a school-wide opportunity for students to receive packets of missing work and to re-take assessments in order to improve grades -- B or Better)"

Nov 04, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Freshman and sophomore core course team leads and AP

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Synergy was successfully piloted in both grade 9 and school-wide in SY16
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Adoption of a unified grading policy that strategically weights assessments by grade level and/or department and a no zero policy for any work that is completed; teachers will receive additional support and training to change teacher approach to student grades"

Aug 29, 2016 to Sep 30, 2016 - ILT and grading sub-committee

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Finalization of SY16 conversations will be adopted over the summer for implementation at SY17 Opening Teacher Institutes
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Off-track students will be identified every 5 weeks and assigned an adult mentor to coach them back to passing by offering academic, behavioral, and SEL support"

Oct 03, 2016 to May 25, 2017 - FOT and SOT committee chairs

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Mentoring of freshmen was successfully piloted in SY16; ready for roll out with both freshmen and sophomores in SY17
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Identification and screening of at-risk incoming freshmen through summer programs (Summer Acceleration and Freshman Connection) to recommend beginning of school year interventions"

Jun 27, 2016 to Jul 22, 2016 - Counseling Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Pending summer counselor funding; GEAR UP and WOW providing supports in summer 2016
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Common planning time for both course teams and grade-level teams to give teachers opportunity to review student data and student supports/interventions"

Sep 06, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - AP and grade 9/10 core course team leads

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Master schedule reflects the common planning time for course teams and grade-level teams
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Student contracts clearly articulate expectations for graduation and are tied to senior participation in senior activities and walking at graduation; contracts and behavioral expectations are communicated to all students during school opening assemblies"

May 17, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Counseling Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
We are in 6th year of student contract implementation
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Students receive bi-weekly BAG reports for students and families to track grades, attendance, behavior, and graduation requirements"

Sep 13, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - AP

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
BAG report implementation is in year 4 and is consistent
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Create a shared master senior tracker, which identifies all graduation requirements and post-secondary KPIs"

May 17, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Counseling Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Senior Tracker is in year 4 of implementation; GEAR UP assists
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Mandated parent meetings at spring Report Card Pick Up for parents to pick up graduation plans (they pick up graduation tickets as an incentive); regular communication with families"

Apr 13, 2017 to Apr 13, 2017 - Counseling Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Mandatory parent meetings and communications are in place; GEAR UP assists
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Individual counselor meetings with seniors to develop graduation plans in fall and spring; juniors have post-secondary planning in last quarter of their One Goal class"

Sep 06, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Counseling Chair and One Goal Teacher

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Counselors schedule one-on-one meetings in fall and spring to meet with each senior; GEAR UP and One Goal assist
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Completion of non-credit graduation requirements is embedded in courses and recovery opportunities are provided for students who need them (Consumer Ed, Public Law, and service learning)"

Sep 06, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Counseling Chair, Service Learning Coordinator, Social Studies Chair, Programmer

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Courses have been identified and programmed; recovery opportunities are on calendar
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Provide entering freshman with opportunity to participate in Freshman Connection, Orientation, and Summer Acceleration in ordering to begin high school transition"

Jun 27, 2016 to Jul 22, 2016 - Counseling Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
GEAR UP is funding Freshman Connection in summer 2016
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Providing all juniors with One Goal curriculum that includes SAT prep(Seminar III)"

Sep 06, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - One Goal Coordinator

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Grant funding (for 3 years) from One Goal with training for One Goal teachers
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Not started

Providing all freshmen and sophomores with online "No Red Ink" adaptive writing convention program"

Aug 29, 2016 to Sep 26, 2016 - English Chair

Status history

Not started

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
On SY17 budget wishlist; waiting for budget release
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Not started

Providing all freshman (non-SAGA) and seniors (College Algebra) with some pre-AP juniors with ALEKS online adaptive math intervention"

Sep 06, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Math Chair

Status history

Not started

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
On SY17 budget wishlist; wating for budget release
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Including SAT-like assessment questions and language on course-specific formative and summative assessments"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Core Department Chairs

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Begins with summer flex PD planning on 7/1
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Incorporating NGSS science and engineering practices into instructional activities"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Science Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Begins with summer flex PD planning on 7/1
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Revising department-adopted writing strategies with a focus on CCSS/NGSS/SAT alignment"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Core Department Chairs

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Begins with summer flex PD planning on 7/1
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Differentiating curriculum, instruction, and assessments for each band of courses (honors/AP, regular, prep/inclusion, self-contained)"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Core Department, ELL, and DL Chairs

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Begins with summer flex PD planning on 7/1
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Collecting and analyzing assessment data (in-class, PSAT, PARCC, and SAT) to determine skills for re-teaching"

Sep 05, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Core Department Chairs

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Course teams have common planning time in SY17 master schedule
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Not started

Providing math and literacy interventions for identified students (Rewards, Wilson, ALEKS, No Red Ink, Saga)"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - English, Math, DL, and ELL Chairs

Status history

Not started

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Grant funding in place for Saga; Rewards and Wilson teachers are trained; No Red Ink and ALEkS are on wish list
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

4-year seminar sequence to support student post-secondary goals: Seminar I has bi-weekly visits to the post-secondary lab to connect current learning to college preparation; Seminar II has monthly visits to the post-secondary lab (GEAR UP) to create high school plan that links to college and career plans; Seminar III meets daily (One Goal) to support SAT preparation and post-secondary planning; Seminar IV meets weekly in the post-secondary lab to track college and scholarship application progress"

Sep 06, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Counselors

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
GEAR UP and One Goal grants are in place; seminars are programmed in master schedule; post-secondary lab is dedicated
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

In-class and after school workshops to prepare students and families for the FAFSA application and scholarship application; post-secondary lab is open after school for facilitated support"

May 17, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Counselors

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
GEAR UP and post-secondary team are in place and have begun FAFSA workshops in advance of October 2016 FAFSA opening
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Student enrichment committee tracks all enrichment opportunities, creates a monthly bulletin that is communicated to all stakeholders, identifies target students and encourages application, tracks application and participation"

Sep 06, 2016 to Aug 31, 2017 - Counselors

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
GEAR UP and counselors are in place and have system for tracking enrichment opportunities
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Students are given opportunities for students to visit colleges and universities to see academics and cultural supports; grades 9 and 10 visit colleges for exposure; grades 11 and 12 are targeted visits for particular students; students also are encouraged to visit a second time once they have made college decision"

Jun 27, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Counselors

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
GEAR UP, One Goal, Youth Guidance, and Dual Credit Partnerships are in place to support college visitation for all students at all grade levels
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

College and career partners are invited into the school to share resources and opportunities with interested students; FCCA has an annual college and career fair every fall"

Oct 03, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Counselors

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
GEAR UP, Upward Bound, and One Goal are in place next year to support college and career partner visitation
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Foreman families are provided a parent resource room with access to post-secondary workshops, parenting classes, ESL classes, technology lessons, art classes, and book clubs (in English and Spanish)"

Jun 27, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Counseling Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
Parent room is dedicated; GEAR UP, Youth Guidance, Upward Bound and CASA are in place for SY17
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Targeted students receive 1st year of college supports: diverse learners receive follow up phone interviews to check on post-secondary plans; One Goal classes receive Y3 support throughout their first year of college; GEAR UP will follow the graduating class of 2018"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - DL and Counseling Chair

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
List of DLs is already prepared; GEAR UP and One Goal are in place
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Undocumented students are required to complete scholarship applications instead of FAFSA; Visionaries meet after school to support undocumented students and their post-secondary plans; free legal clinics are offered monthly to support students and their families with immigration issues"

Sep 06, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Visionaries Sponsor and Counselors

Status history

On-Track

Jun 02, 2016

Evidence
GEAR UP in place; CPS Legal will confirm continued partnership in the fall of 2017
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps

Supplemental General State Aid(SGSA)

By checking the above box, the school is verifying that the attendance center complies with the statement regarding the use of SGSA funds:

  1. The attendance center allocation is correctly based on the number of students eligible to receive free and reduced lunch and breakfast.
  2. The attendance center has an approced plan, developed in consultation with teachers, administrators, and other appropriate personnel, and parents of thes tudents attending the attendance center.
  3. The attendance center's plan is approved by the LSC and CPS.
  4. SGSA funded activities fall within the allowable program categories: early childhood education, reduced class size, enrichment programs, remedial assistance, attendance improvement, and other educationally beneficial expenditures which supplement the regular programs as determined by the illinois state board of education.
  5. SGSA Funds supplement and do not suppland non-categorical and other categorical funds allocated to the attendance center.
  6. SGSA funds are supporting only those activities specified in the school's approved plan/amendment.
  7. SGSA funds are not used for capital expenditures. 8. SGSA funds are not used for any political or lobbying activities by the attendance center.

NCLB Program

(Not available to schools receiving NCLB funds for the first time) [Title 1/SW].

The school annually reviews the schoolwide plan/program. The schoolwide program plan is available to CPS, parents, and the public, and the information in the plan is in an understandable and uniform format, and to the extent practicable in a language the parents can understand.

Title I funded staff participate in the school's general professional development and school planning activities. Title I funded staff assume limited duties that are assigned to similar personnel including duties beyond the classroom, or that do not benefit Title I students, as long as the amount of time spent on such duties is the same proportion of the total work time with respect to similar staff.

NCLB Schoolwide Program

Foreman utilizes PARCC, ACT (SY16), PSAT (SY17), and SAT(SY17) attainment and growth data to assess student progress school-wide in the areas of English, reading, science, and math. Assessments are administered annually, and all curriculum is aligned to Common Core State Standards, as are all assessments. ACCESS testing is used to determine ELL program eligibility. Teachers administer fluency assessments for grade 9 math and reading placement as well as Spanish language fluency placement (Spanish I v. Spanish Heritage v. AP Spanish Language). In addition to assessment data, school programs are evaluated based on other SQRP metrics: attendance, graduation rate, early college attainment, college enrollment and persistence, and school culture (MVMS). Foreman's overall SQRP rating for the last 4 years has been Level 2.
Our curricular framework provides opportunities for four distinct bands of each course: self-contained, prep/inclusion, regular, and honors/pre-AP coursework in all core content areas with regular progress checks for diagonal movement across bands. All courses share common focus standards, common unit maps, common formative and summative assessments, and common instructional tasks that align to the Common Core State Standards. Students who are particularly behind in reading and math receive additional interventions, including an extra period of English in grades 9 and 10 and double period math in grades 9 and 11. Advanced students have access to Compass testing for placement in dual credit courses in addition to AP courses in most content areas. ELL students have supports in our ESL program; diverse learners are programmed for supports based on their IEPs.
All courses are aligned to Common Core State Standards and are backward mapped from capstone AP courses so that course sequences are vertically aligned. Students are required to sign up for evening and summer school for credit recovery to allow more time during the school day for quality instruction. Science courses are aligned to Next Generation Science Standards. Banded classes provide differentiated supports for all learners while maintaining common expectations for achievement.
Foreman has a robust system for student referrals for academic, behavioral, and social emotional interventions. All teachers use Verify Logger to record student behavior concerns, parent outreach, and requests for academic, behavioral, and social and emotional intervention. Counselors receive all referrals and respond within 48 hours. Data are collected are used to determine individual student academic, behavioral, and attendance interventions through our MTSS Intervention Team and ad hoc Problem Solving Teams. Foreman also offers four seminar courses (one at each grade level) that focus on high school transition, study skills and goal setting, college application process, financial aid application process, and long-term college and career planning. After school tutoring is available to all students in all core courses for students needing additional academic support after school. Summer and evening school are offered to allow students to make up failed course credits.
Foreman works closely with the Talent office to ensure that all positions are appropriately posted and that all prospective candidates are highly qualified for positions that that they are applying for. All current Foreman teachers are highly qualified in their assigned areas of instruction. All teachers whose credentials are at risk of lapsing have been notified personally to achieve the necessary requirements for continued certification. REACH teacher evaluations include principal observation, student feedback, EPAS growth data, and performance task data and provide teachers with specific, actionable steps for improving instruction.
Professional development at Foreman includes teacher training in instructional planning (using Common Core and SAT expectations to align curriculum and assessments), backward design from AP capstone courses to vertically align course sequences, common teacher team time, department planning time, grade level planning time, small group workshops on targeted, high-priority topics, a continued focus on interdisciplinary writing, best practices in homework, and impact of trauma on learning. Annually teachers receive training on providing Least Restrictive Environment, differentiation, and supporting language acquisition in English Language Learners.
Our BLT team is dedicated to tracking accurate parent contact information and providing parent communication. We have established a parent resource room with access to computers and phones. Our bilingual parents participate in the BAC, and all parents are invited to participate in the PAC. In addition, parents participate on the Local School Council. In addition, there is monthly principal-directed time for teachers to contact parents and log the results of the conversations in Verify Logger. Through partnerships with GEAR UP, Youth Guidance, CASA, and other external partners, parents participate in ESL classes,computer training, arts and crafts, book club, parenting workshops, and post-secondary planning.
N/A
All departments are represented on the school Instructional Leadership Team. The vision of the ILT is To lead the school’s effort to support the improvement of Tier 1 teaching and learning with the explicit purpose of raising student achievement for all students and narrowing achievement gaps. Foreman also has a Behavioral Leadership Team made up of teacher leaders who ensure that attendance goals are met and that behavioral and social emotional learning supports are in place. In addition, teacher leaders are also coordinating course teams, PPC (contract related issues), PPLC (general administrative advising), MTSS intervention team, data team, and department teams.
All entering students receive individual diagnostic fluency assessement.
All students significantly below grade level in reading receive special reading programs to meet their needs, Wilson or Rewards.
All grade 9 and 10 students receive a second instructional period of English/reading/language arts. Struggling readers also may receive Rewards or Wilson Reading Interventions. In SY17, No Red Ink will be used to support writing interventions.
All grade 9 and some grade 11 students receive an additional instructional period in mathematics. Math offers ALEKS as an online diagnostic and math intervention tool.
All grade 11 students receive an additional instructional period in Seminar III, which is funded through One Goal and offers SAT testing support as well as post-secondary goal setting.
All students are programmed into the appropriate band of each course (self-contained, prep/inclusion, regular, or honors/AP). Every 5 weeks through the start of 2nd semester, teachers evaluate student progress to recommend diagonal movement among bands. Teachers also provide classroom interventions that are tracked in Verify Logger; when classroom interventions are ineffective, teachers make referrals for academic, behavioral, and social emotional support to the student's counselor. Counselors assign tier 2 or 3 interventions, which can include 1 on 1 tutoring, school-day intervention time, after school tutoring, small group support, and/or mentoring support.
All support services are coordinated through our MTSS Lead and head of counseling. Interventions are tracked using a student database with support from deans, counselors, school social worker, school psychologist, school nurse, advisory teachers, and SLC House Leads. Vocational and technical programs include digital media and computer science course work. Behavioral interventions include BAM and WOW for enhancing school connectedness and participation, anger management small group sessions, one to one counseling, and support for teen mothers. All external intervention partners meet monthly for whole group coordination and individually with the MTSS lead to ensure that all resources are appropriately assigned, monitored, and ultimately successful student interventions.

NCLB Targeted Assistance Program

  1. Eligible children have been identified by the school as failing, or most at risk of failing to meet the state's students academic achievement standards on the basis of multiple, educationally related, objective criteria.
  2. Children from pre-school through grade two have been selected solely on the basis of such criteria as teacher judgment, parent interviews, and developmentally appropriate measures.

Parent Involvement in Targeted Assistance and Schoolwide Programs

No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 continues a legislative commitment to parental involvement. Central features of prior reauthorizations, such as school-parent compacts, parent involvement policies, and the parent involvement funding formula remain unaltered. However, the NCLB reauthorization represents a notable shift in the role of parental involvement in the schools. It includes new provisions increasing parental notification requirements, parental selection of educational options, and parental involvement in governance. It envisions parents as informed and empowered decision makers in their children's education.

All parents are invited to attend the Local School Council meetings as well as any other related meetings, such as PAC and BAC meetings. Flyers are sent home and translated in Spanish. Phone messages are sent home the day before each meeting and are translated in Spanish. Notice is also posted on Foreman's web-site. Foreman has increased our social media communication to include Facebook and Twitter. CIWP is reviewed annually in its entirety, and elements of our CIWP are focused on during LSC, PAC, and BAC meetings througout the school year.
The NCLB/Title I principal presentation will be held for parents at a meeting on September 28, 2016. Foreman's PAC committee has meetings scheduled monthly throughout the year; the PAC organizational meeting is scheduled for October 19, 2016 with the first regular meeting on November 2, 2016. Monthly, the dates have been set up so that the first meeting is in September and the last one is in June Flyers are sent home the week of each scheduled meeting and using the phone system the day before as a reminder. All flyers are translated in Spanish. The phone message sent home is also recorded in all three languages of English, Spanish. All parents are invited to attend these meetings.
Foreman will send pertinent information on a timely basis to parents regarding their child's progress by mail every other week (BAG reports) in addition to regular progress reports and report cards. Teachers are also advised to contact parents when needed for any issues related to attendance, tardies, grades declining. Teachers will call home (using principal-directed time) if any of these issues arise and if translation is needed in Spanish or Polish, either and ESP or co-teacher will assist as needed. The parent portal is also a new form of communicating with parents. E-mail is an additional option for parents and for the school to reach parents. Parents may meet with teachers by appointment as needed. Also, parents will receive curricular information during orientation, report card pick up days, and at SLC, PAC, and BAC meetings.
All Local School Council meetings, NCLB Parent Advisory Council meetings are open to all parents and participation is encouraged. PAC officials are elected in September with monthly meetings running September through June. The schedule dates for meetings are given to parents at orientation and open houses. An agenda is posted in the school office and notices are sent home in English,Spanish. There is an open forum listed on the agenda that gives parents the opportunity to discuss issues of concerns. If the questions asked are on a personal level then Administration will ask to set up a meeting where the issue can be addressed privately. Any school-wide suggestions stated will be considered and follow-up will be either by mail or at the next scheduled meeting. Parents may also meet with school personnel by appointment as requested.
Communication regarding students performance will be sent home through progress reports every five weeks; report card pick-up is schedule for parents to come to the school for the first and third quarter. At this time, parents will meet their homeroom teacher and be able to see everyone of their child's teachers. Available translators in Spanish will be available. The second and final report cards will be sent home. The parent portal gradebook on-line is another form of communicating with parents on how well their child is performing. Parents have access anytime on-line to see an up-to-date progress on their child. Any scores such as State tests will be sent home with the students.
At the present, all of Foreman's teachers are "highly qualified" but if we were in this situation, we would notify parents in writing by mail. Notification would be translated in Spanish.
All State scores or testing that students take at Foreman are given to the students to take home to their parents' for review. Tips on improving these scores are attached for parents to read. When feasible and time permits, the information is translated in Spanish. The School Report Card is provided to all parents as soon as it's available in the fall (usually Report Card Pick Up); a presentation reviewing the school's progress is also given at this time with all parents invited via robo-call, letter home, and on the website.
Mental Health services and legal services are provided to parents through external partners (CPS Legal, Youth Guidance, GEAR UP, and CASA). Mental health services provide parents with information to identify the signs that their child might be depressed or other situations related to taking drugs. These type of situations could cause a student's grades to go down. Parents are encouraged to actively participate in local and out-of-state workshops/ leadership conferences through Title I funding. Legal services are provided at no-cost for immigration, criminal, and advisory legal issues. Foreman also offers training for the Parent Portal on how to access the site on-line. After school time is open for parents to utilize the parent resource room and to meet teachers. The parent information packet is distributed at Orientation and report card pick-up. These have detailed information regarding Foreman's policies. The student handbook is posted on-line for parents to view.
The Faculty will have workshops on parent involvement on staff development days brainstorming on implementing parent involvement. Communicating within the departments discussing what is working and ways to reach out to more parents. Outside programs such as Gear up and After School Matters are partners with Foreman in coordinating parent participation in workshops that foster literacy (there is a parent book club) and training in technology (parent portal and e-mail training provided). FCCA also works with the Polish Alliance (a local organization) to provide ESL adult education, which is open to all parents. This will enable them to feel more comfortable talking to teachers and Administration. GEAR UP, Youth Guidance and CASA provide weekly Spanish ESL classes, Spanish Book Club, English Book Club, Computer Class, Art Class, and parent workshops and field trips.
Foreman will continue to provide support needed activities to help them participate in their child's education in High School. The PAC runs monthly meetings in partnership with GEAR UP, CASA, and Youth Guidance that include workshops and training for parents on some of the following topics: getting ready for testing, reading student transcripts, training to support at-home parenting, college readiness. Parents are also encouraged to attend regional and national parent conferences. Our GEAR UP partnership and National Museum of Mexican Art partnership also provide parents with field trips, arts and crafts, ESL support, book club, post secondary workshops, FAFSA workshops, and other pertinent informational workshops.
Parent information packets will be distributed at the beginning of the School Year during orientation. The packet has dates of the Local School Council meetings, NCLB PAC Council meetings, Bilingual Parent Meetings, Report Card pick-up dates, the monthly calendar of school events. The packet is translated in English and Spanish (when possible). Flyers are either given to the students to take home to their parents, newsletters mailed home, reminder notices on the phone system, posting on the Foreman's web-site of all important dates to remember. Parents with active e-mail addresses also receive the weekly principal newsletter.

Policy Implementation Activities

N/A
We envision Foreman College and Career Academy as a superior educational environment where high quality teaching engages all students, including students with disabilities, in continuous learning. To achieve our vision we will do the following: WE WILL provide a safe and orderly school environment built upon mutual respect and positive behavior. WE WILL hold high expectations for all faculty, staff, students, and families to support an environment conducive to teaching and learning. WE WILL engage families as partners in the responsibility of educating our students. WE WILL provide a rigorous and standards-based curriculum tailored to meet the needs of our students. WE WILL provide a variety of course offerings to prepare students for success in post-secondary learning or entrance into the work place. WE WILL provide a systematic approach to supporting students success throughout high school. MISSION STATEMENT: Our mission at Foreman is to prepare all of our students, including students with disabilities, for post-secondary learning and/or entrance into the work force.
FCCA will hold a summer orientation (Freshman Connection) and parent-teacher conferences (one fall, one spring) during which this compact will be discussed as it relates to the individual child's achievement. The conferences will be held on the two dates designated by CPS as report-card pick-up days, during the parent open houses, during BAC & PAC, NCLB meetings, during IEP meetings, and as needed, when scheduled through the student's counselor.
FCCA provides parents with frequent reports on their child's progress. Specifically, the school will continue to provide reports as follows: every other week, students receive BAG reports detailing their current grades, attendance, behavior and progress toward graduation (for seniors). Once every five weeks a progress report or grade report will be mailed to the address of record for each student; phone calls from teacher and atttendance staff to call homes regarding attendance issues. In addition, all parents have access to Gradebook Parent Portal, and Foreman offers training sessions on accessing Parent Portal at August student orientation, all open houses, all report card pick up sessions, and one-on-one sessions when parents are in the building for IEP meetings.
We will continue to provide parents reasonable access to staff. Specifically, staff will be available for consultation with parents as follows: On the two dates designated by CPS as report-card pick-up days, and daily via access to Parent Portal. During the parent nights for freshman/sophomores and juniors/seniors. During BAC and PAC/NCLB meetings. During IEP meetings. By appointment every Tuesday morning as needed, contact your student's counselor.
FCCA will provide parents opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child's class, and to observe classroom activities, as determined through consultation with the Parent Advisory Council, the Local School Council, and the Foreman Leadership Team. All parent shadow days are coordinated through the attendance office. Parents can also make requests in the dedicated parent room through our GEAR UP partners.
Parents will support their child's learning in several ways. Attendance: Child will be on time for school; Child will attend school on a daily basis. Dress code: Child will be in compliance with the school dress code and ID on before entering the school. Homework and Learning Tools: child will be prepared to learn by having homework assignments complete on the day required; child will have the necessary supplies, paper, pen and bring the required books for each class. Cut Down on TV: child will be monitored on television time; television time will be reduced to allow more reading time. Curfew: Follow the City mandated curfew for students to be in by 10:00 pm Sunday Thursday; Friday and Saturday evening in by 11:00 pm. Talk about School: Time will be set aside to have family conversation with my child and see what is going on in their life. Quiet time: the child will read in a quiet area in the home. Check Assignments: Review homework to be sure it is complete. Help my child if assistance is needed to understand the assignment only do not do the homework for him/her. Keep in touch with the School: Get to know my child's teachers and other school staff.
Parents will go to School Conferences, attend parent-teacher conferences and open houses at school to see out how their child is doing in each of their classes, ask additional questions to see if their child is up to the standard grade level, ask teachers if they have noticed any changes of their child's personality that could be the cause of peer pressures that need to be monitored, and be provided opportunity for professional development and parent workshop attendance. Besides contacting teachers, parents can contact the Principal, Assistant Principals, Attendance Coordinator,Social Worker, Case Manager or the Deans. All teachers are expected to contact parents for support, if a student is failing or in danger of failing any course.
Foreman College and Career Academy students will: Attend school and be on time on a daily basis; Be in compliance with the dress code and have their ID on before entering the school; Be prepared for class everyday; complete homework as assign; continue by example to enhance the school-wide PBIS (Respect yourself, others, and the school environment); attend tutoring, night school, and utilize other school supports to ensure their academic success. Students will track their own progress through Grade Portal and bi-weekly BAG reports.
Parent funds are used to support parent learning through workshops, attendance at professional development, supplies for the parent room, and for refreshments at key parent events to encourage high involvement. The goal is to ensure that parents have all the resources they need to support their students. The budget below is for SY16; the SY17 budget is to be released May 2016

Allocate your Mandated Title 1 Parent Involvement Funds to support your Parent Involvement Program.

Account(s)
Description
Allocation

51130, 52130
Teacher Presenter/ESP Extended Day
For Teacher presenter, ESP Extended Day, please remember to put money on the benefits line. Non-Instructional pay rate applies.
$
.00

53405
Supplies
In addition to supplies for parent program, please use this account to also purchase books for parents only. Use this account for equipment with a per unit cost of less than $500.
$
.00

53205
Refreshments
Allocation CAN NOT EXCEED 25% of the Parent Budget. Refreshments must be used for Title 1 PAC meetings, trainings and workshops.
$
.00

54125
Consultants
For Parent Training Only. Consultant must have a CPS vendor number and paid with a Purchase Order after service is rendered (NO CHECKS ARE ALLOWED)
$
.00

54505
Admission and Registration Fees, Subscriptions and memberships
For Parents use only.
$
.00

54205
Travel
Buses for Parents use. Overnight Conference travel- schoolsmust follow the CPS Tracel Policy. The CPS Parent Overnight Travel Approval Form and Conference Travel Form must be completed.
$
.00

54565
Reimbursements
Allocation CAN NOT EXCEED 25% OF THE Parent Budget. All Parent Reimbursements related to Title 1 Parent Involvement must be paid from this account. Receipts must be clear unaltered and itemized. School must keep all receipts.
$
.00

53510
Postage
Must be used for parent involvement programs only.
$
.00

53306
Software
Must be educational and for parent use only.
$
.00

55005
Furniture and Equipment
Must have a parent room or a secure place to keep furniture/equipment. Cannot be placed in the main office or where staff and students have access too. To by used only by parents.
$
.00

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