2016-2018 plan summary

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Name

Role

Email

Access


Paul Karafiol
Interim Principal
pjkarafiol@cps.edu
Has access

Angela Newton
Assistant Principal of STEM
adnewton1@cps.edu
Has access

Toney Vast-Binder
Assistant Principal of Instruction
tvast-binder@cps.edu
Has access

James Fusco
Dept Leader English
jpfusco@cps.edu
Has access

Vyjayanti Joshi
Dept Leader Science
vjoshi@cps.edu
Has access

Katheryn Sanford-Garcia
Dept Leader Visual Arts
ksanford-garcia@cps.edu
Has access

William Loomos
Dept Leader Physical Education
wmloomos@cps.edu
Has access

Tasha Young
Dept Leader Counseling
tkyoung@cps.edu
Has access

Patty Arroyo
Dept Leader Diverse Learning
parroyo@cps.edu
Has access

Shoja Thomas
ILT Math
sathomas@cps.edu
Has access

Beth Tobin
ILT World Language
ektobin@cps.edu
Has access

Monte Luzadder
Parent, Community, LSC Chairperson
monteluzadder@gmail.com
Has access

Mark Hiebert
ILT Music
mahiebert@cps.edu
Has access

Tyrese Graham
Assistant Principal of STEM
tlgraham@cps.edu
Has access

Peggy Herrington
Parent, Community, PAC Chairperson
peggyherrington@yahoo.com
Has access

Date

Participants

Topic


02/17/2016
CIWP Team
Reflecting on the CIWP and the School Excellence Framework

02/29/2016
CIWP Team
Finalizing the School Effectiveness Framework

03/14/2016
CIWP Team
Gaining Consensus on CIWP Priority Areas

03/28/2016
CIWP Team
Action Planning for CIWP Strategies #1-5

03/24/2016
LSC
Review and Feedback of the SEF and CIWP

04/11/2016
CIWP Team
Finalizing the CIWP

05/10/2016
CIWP Team
Finalizing the CIWP

05/05/2016
CIWP Team
Action Planning

04/29/2016
CIWP Team
Finalizing the CIWP

Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement (4 of 4 complete)     Expand all

Leadership & Collective Responsibility:

Leadership & Collective Responsibility is characterized by an unwavering commitment to fulfilling a shared vision of success. There is a clear focus and high expectations for staff and students, motivating the entire school community to continue striving for success for every student.

Where to look for evidence

1) Active ILT - with flex PD usually ran by ILT.
2) Twice weekly department/course team meetings.
3) Non-student attendance days (PD) is towards collective leadership and learning.
4) Collaborative activities with course teams and departments (assess to grow protocol)
5) ILT and department leaders are different people - more room for leadership opportunities.
6) Many leadership opportunies in school.
7) School's vision, beliefs, and how it is shared.
8) Five Essentials: strong in teacher-principal trust, admin setting high expectations for teaching and learning, teachers working together to plan instruction and monitor assessment data, and PD being rigorous and focused on student learning. Neutral in teachers having influence over decisions; teachers sharing responsibility for student, self, and school growth; teachers being committed to the school; and teacher-teacher trust.
9) Monthly Newsletter
10) Open House, Spring Showcase.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Leadership & Collective Responsibility

  • Set the direction and create a sense of purpose by building consensus on and implementing a shared vision.
    • Consider the demographics of the school community in developing a shared vision.
    • Help stakeholders understand the relationship between the school’s vision and their initiatives and priorities.
    • Consistently use informal and formal opportunities to champion and articulate the vision.
    • Act in ways that consistently reflect the school’s core values, beliefs, and priorities in order to establish trust.
    • Ensure the school’s identity, vision, and mission drive school decisions.
  • Inspire a culture of collective responsibility for the success of ALL students in the whole school (not solely teacher’s own students).
  • Empower others to make or influence significant decisions.
    • Build shared leadership structures and opportunities for job-embedded leadership training and development.
    • Capitalize on the leadership skills of others.
    • Constantly listen and synthesize what is heard, and learn from all sources.
  • Employ the skills to effectively manage change.
    • Master skills associated with large-scale strategic planning processes and implementation of such plans.
    • Steer through the challenges associated with making improvements, both large and small.
  • Create and sustain a coherent instructional program (coordinated and consistent) with learning goals.
  • Use the CPS Framework for Teaching to ground instructional guidance and coaching.
    • Model ambitious goals for teaching and learning for all students, including priority groups.
    • Draw from the best available evidence to inform instructional improvement decisions.
  • Enable staff to focus and prioritize what matters most.
    • Buffer staff from external distractions to the school’s priorities and goals.
    • Limit school improvement goals to a few high leverage activities.
    • Prioritize teaching challenging content, engaging students in learning, rigor and ways to raise achievement.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Instructional Leadership Team:

The ILT is characterized by having a consistent structure for teacher leadership that is focused on creating and implementing the theories of action that improve teaching and learning. ILT meetings are a productive forum to identify challenges, collect and review evidence, exchange ideas, and propose and implement solutions to challenges to school improvement.

Where to look for evidence

1) ILT meets every other week.
2) Developed a TIA through research of data - students test scores (ACT, AP), student responses on 5Essentials. Analysis took place via guidance from the Network for College Success, as well as how to best use the data to develop effective instructional practices
3) ILT leads regular Flex PD to their departments.
4) ILT provides the staff with a voice in school change.
5) ILT partners with NCS and ILTs from other schools to work together to make changes.
6) ILT effectiveness rubric helping team to focus on improving stakeholder communication and including their voices, analysis of student work, development of tools, and clarity of objectives
7) ILT artifacts - student TIA rubric for mastery of claims and evidence, Learning Walk data on evidence of TIA in classrooms and across the school, ILT teacher-task matrix

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Instructional Leadership Team

  • Engage in on-going inquiry (e.g. continuous improvement cycles) as a basis for improvement.
    • Gain productive insight and take substantial new action or adjust strategy that clearly addresses root causes.
    • Relentlessly ask, “Is it working?” about every program, initiative, and strategy in the school.
    • Vet Initiatives and strategies on the basis of their direct or proven impact on outcomes.
    • Monitor if previous actions were implemented (fidelity) and working as intended. Ask, "If not, why not?"
  • Share leadership for improving teaching and learning with representative school members.
    • Organize the team around a common understanding of team’s purpose and instructional priorities.
    • Represent all relevant specialty content areas, programs, related services, and grade bands/department teams and is an appropriate size.
    • Represent a balance of work styles (e.g. task-oriented, provides push-back, synthesizes, etc.)
  • Use protocols and ask probing questions.
    • Ask questions focused on factors within sphere of control and avoid a focus on student factors.
    • Use appropriate protocols and level of analysis (grade, school-wide, individuals) for meeting purpose.
    • Systematically consider root cause(s) based on thorough review of evidence.
  • Use timely and relevant data/evidence sources.
    • Gather and use current and relevant local student, school, teacher performance (e.g. attendance data, assessment results), and operational data formatively to review and revise school and classroom practices as needed.
    • Disaggregate data for priority student groups (e.g. English learners, diverse learners).
  • Schedule and structure frequent meetings.
    • Meet regularly (2-4 times per month).
    • Use an agenda with a clear focus.
  • Collaborate effectively, value transparency, and inform and engage stakeholders.
    • All team members have equity of voice and are actively engaged in asking questions.
    • Celebrate small wins and improvements.
    • Regularly inform and engage stakeholders of key data and work of the ILT.
  • Build the capacity of teacher teams to lead cycles of learning and problem solving focused on student learning data and student work.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Professional Learning:

Professional Learning includes sufficient time, support, and ‘safe practice’ space to internalize new knowledge to change practice and beliefs. Adults persevere in collaboration with their colleagues to innovate and improve implementation of new practices.

Where to look for evidence

1) ILT follows school-wide norms
2) Departments/course teams follow school-wide, and sometimes their own, norms
3) ILT meets every other week
4) Staff meets every other week for flex PD
5) Departments/Course teams meet 2 a week
6) Department leaders meet every other week.
7) Most departments have an upgraded office space to meet as a team in a good working environment.
8) Time during PD for staff to collaborate around restorative practices and instructional protocols
9) PD effectiveness on REACH Scores

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Professional Learning

  • Select and design professional learning (PL) to achieve school-wide improvement, including closing priority group achievement gaps.
    • Use data to identify performance and practice gaps to inform PL plan.
    • Use research about best practices to identify potential learning and subject matter experts to support.
    • Solicit feedback from staff to inform selection of PL opportunities.
    • Provide PL relevant to the cultural and linguistic needs of students.
    • Provide both whole staff and differentiated PL to individual teacher levels.
  • Implement and sustain on-going, job-embedded professional learning (PL) (e.g. coaching, peer learning opportunities, action research)
    • Recommend and/or provide PL opportunities directly related to individuals’ specific areas of need and professional growth goals.
    • Encourage staff to broaden networks to bring new knowledge and resources to learning environment.
    • Teachers initiate opportunities for professional growth and proactively seek opportunities to enhance content knowledge and pedagogical skill.
  • Structure time for teachers to collaborate and learn together. 
    • Create schedules and systems to conduct peer observations, and coaching. Reflect on its impact.
    • Teachers provide and accept collegial support and feedback to/from colleagues.
    • Teachers participate in and facilitate professional inquiry in teams to advance student learning.
  • Make ‘safe practice’ an integral part of professional learning.
    • Allow teachers ample time to try new strategies, refine skills, grapple with implementation problems, and share knowledge and experience.
    • Provide support that addresses the specific challenges of changing classroom practice. Provide coaching/mentoring support to validate continuing to work through struggles.
  • Monitor implementation to ensure staff uses new knowledge to improve practice and it is having the desired effect on practice and student outcomes.
    • Conduct frequent non-REACH observations to provide coaching and actionable feedback.
  • Provide induction and support for new teachers.
    • Assign each new teacher a mentor who is skilled in pedagogy and is an open, collaborative colleague.
    • Schedule a series of ‘learning experiences’ for new teachers that helps them navigate important initiatives (e.g. REACH) and provides information on school specific goals and resources.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Aligned Resources:

Resources (e.g. time, budget, staff, and community resources) are aligned to school priorities. Improving achievement guides resource allocation. Making the most of student time and staffing is a priority. The school organizes resources school-wide through schedules and staffing plans that target additional time and individual attention to those students who need it most and to highest priority subject areas.

Where to look for evidence

1)Common planning prep for all departments except PE.
2) Many departments partner with community based organizations. Ex: Counseling and deans with Alternatives and Youth Outreach Services, English with Chicago Shakespeare Company; LVHS with Microsoft, DePaul, and the community/alumni.
3) Imput by department members for hiring of new staff members.
4) Schedules (what did we mean here?)
5) Teacher retention rates (Meghan getting from Scott)
6) Candidate interview protocol documents
7) Evidence of effectiveness of the services that community based organizations provide. Ex: Before and after self-assessments for students working with Youth Outreach Services.
8) Budget allocation aligned to CIWP priorities such as funding Freshmen FX Tutoring program, and ACT Tutoring with Academic Approach 9) Time allocated according to priorities with focus on: specific Courses of Study; Reallocation of 3 Flex PD Days to 21 meetings; Adherence to a Professional Learning Plan
10) Money for identified priorities found through grant-writing, Donors Choose, fundraisers, and increased volunteers at events;

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Aligned Resources

  • Design a school day that is responsive to student needs.
    • Use CPS Instructional Time Guidelines to maximize instructional time.
    • Use CPS Instructional Block Guidelines to maximize academic-engaged time.
  • Align the budget to the CIWP priorities and the mission of the school.
    • Avoid overemphasis on the purchase of products/programs that are not research based or do not respond to SEF needs.
    • Leverage strategic source vendors to maximize dollars.
    • Seek and obtain grants to support articulated needs.
    • Use grant funds strategically to support areas of highest need.
    • Maximize the use of supplemental funding to close any priority group achievement gaps.
  • Streamline purchase procedures to minimize lapses between ordering and receiving materials.
  • Evaluate, to the extent possible, the consequences for student learning of resource allocation decisions to develop an evidence base of outcomes of particular uses of resources.
  • Have a ‘hiring team’ and collaborative hiring process with clear selection criteria to identify and select best available candidates.
    • Actively work to build a pool of potential staff members, particularly difficult to fill positions (e.g. staff to serve English learners).
    • Use an interview process including a protocol for questioning and select highly qualified candidates.
    • Require a classroom lesson demonstration to assess candidate expertise, philosophy and commitment.
    • Check teachers’ previous performance at CPS schools.
  • Strategically assign teachers to grade and content areas to create a balanced team with a variety of strengths.
    • Ensure all students have fair access to high-quality teachers in the school.
  • Effectively utilize Related Service Providers at the classroom level.
  • Use data including teacher evaluations and exit interviews to inform a retention strategy.
    • Create a positive climate and working conditions for teaching that attracts and retains educator talent.
    • Create opportunities for growth including opportunities for staff to assume additional leadership roles or pursue personal growth goals.
    • Track retention rates over time and use this information to isolate staffing strengths and identify opportunities to improve.
    • Solicit information from staff using exit interviews/surveys to understand reasons for leaving school or district.
  • Make outreach efforts to engage community members as partners and resources.
  • Partner with one or more organizations that share the values of the school and have a complementary mission to the school’s vision.
    • Monitor the impact of partner organizations’ activity.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning (4 of 4 complete)     Expand all

Curriculum:

The curriculum – what students should know and be able to do - makes standards come alive for students. All students have access to an academically rigorous curriculum that inspires students to think and contribute high quality work to authentic audiences beyond the classroom. The curriculum fully integrates academic and social emotional learning opportunities for all students, including diverse learners, English learners, and advanced learners. The school regularly examines the curriculum to check alignment to standards and opportunities for all students to meet those standards.

Where to look for evidence

1. I CAN Statements for each standard
2. Unit Plans that address the standards but not always implemented in the classroom
3. Common Assessments that address the standards
4. Developing Scope and Sequence
5. The Depth of Knowledge protocol to ensure assessments are rigorous and aligned with standards
6. IEP goals aligned to standards
8. Course Descriptions written for student choice
9. Programming students using data
11. Advisory lessons - social emotional learning
12. ELL program
13. BIPs are not written to be actionable for stakeholders
14. Course descriptions distinguish between regular and honors courses, and some assessments are differentiated. 15. Assistive technology to help instruction 16. Varying levels of classes for ALL learners (Reg, Honors, Team Taught, A.P, Dual Credit) , but differentiation not always evident

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Curriculum

  • Adhere to the CPS Content Frameworks (MathScienceSocial Science, and Literacy) to ensure alignment of scope and text and task complexity.
    • Provide a range and depth to knowledge and understanding of learning experiences that are language and content rich.
  • Align units of instruction (horizontally/vertically) to scope and sequence maps and pace units and lessons appropriately.
    • Focus so units can be adequately addressed in the time available.
    • Examine formative data to determine mastery and pace. Discuss how much time it takes to adequately address the essential elements, and the viability of documents that articulate essential content and timing of delivery (e.g. pacing guides, curriculum maps).
  • Utilize the ‘big ideas’ that should be taught to determine whether students are being taught the body of knowledge, the understandings and the skills expected.
    • Identify the essential understandings – what students should learn in greater depth. In other words, know ‘covering everything but learning nothing’ does not work.
  • Expose and extend opportunities for all students to grade appropriate levels of text complexity in all types of texts, including informational in all content areas.
    • Articulate language goals that are separate from and support content goals. Literacy - reading, writing and speaking are essential ‘learning tools’ across the curriculum (disciplinary literacy).
  • Engage all learners in content areas by fully integrating opportunities for all learners, including:
    • Diverse learners to demonstrate core knowledge and skills.
    • English Learners to develop academic language to demonstrate mastery.
      • Use English and native language development in addition to content standards to differentiate for English learners.
      • Understand research and implement programs to develop native language literacy for English learners.
    • Advanced learners to extend core knowledge and skills.
  • Distinguish qualitatively and quantitatively between ‘regular courses’ and ‘advanced courses’ (e.g.  AP, gifted, etc.)
  • Integrate academic and social emotional learning.
  • Reach outside of the classroom for real world (or simulated) application. For example,
    • Incorporate web capabilities for interactivity and information sharing.
    • Integrate field-based learning through partnerships with city institutions (e.g. museums), colleges, universities, and community based organizations.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Instructional Materials:

Materials to present learning content and what the learner uses to demonstrate are characterized by variability and flexibility. Materials are identified and adapted to increase access to learning for all students. Materials include multimedia and embedded, just-in-time supports; varied tools and supports; alternative pathways, and varied levels of support and challenge. (adapted from UDL Guidelines 2.0)

Where to look for evidence

1. Use of Assistive Technology to meet needs of DL
2. Differentiation for students
3. Description of materials in unit plans
4. Computer-based technology
5. Access to real labs and virtual labs
6. ELL students have access to computer-based technologies to assist in language acquisition.
7. Wilson students have assistive technologies 8. English Dept. has a variety of texts levels for different interests and reading abilities (?)

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Instructional Materials

Instructional materials (including technology) are…..

  • Aligned to curricular plans and expectations of the standards.
  • Varied and flexible.
    • Are selected and adapted based on learning objectives and learner needs.
    • Include a variety of quality media, manipulatives and supplies to achieve valued learning outcomes.
  • Intentionally planned by identifying or adapting appropriate tools (including technology) for specific instructional needs.
    • Student outcomes and developmental appropriateness determine when and who will use the materials.
    • Materials are updated/upgraded in response to new information and understandings.
  • Equitably available and accessible to all teachers and students.
    • Teachers and students have available a variety of high quality, standards-aligned instructional materials and resources.
    • Materials are in English and native language for English learners.
    • Reference and resource materials are readily available and circulated throughout the school.
  • Include multimedia and embedded, just-in-time supports (e.g. hyperlinked glossaries, background information, and on-screen coaching) – for conveying conceptual knowledge.
    • Students interact with instructional materials to engage all modalities in the learning process.
    • Technology is integral to students learning experiences.
    • Units and lessons include grade-appropriate levels of texts and other materials so every student can access the content/skills.
  • Include tools and supports needed to access, analyze, organize, synthesize, and demonstrate understanding in varied ways – for learning and expression of knowledge.
    • The needs of the students at different performance levels are met by using a variety of instructional materials that allow students to draw on all of their learning capacities.
    • The teacher models effective use of various materials.
    • Students understand that materials are a means to acquire language, knowledge, and competencies.
    • Technology enhances students’ higher order, creative thinking and problem solving.
    • Materials connect subject area content to real life applications.
  • Include alternative pathways including choice of content, varied levels of support and challenge, and options for recruiting and sustaining interest and motivation – for engaging and learning.
    • Students make choices about instructional materials as part of learning.
    • Materials address the needs of the total child: cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, physical, and aesthetic.
    • Consumables are often non-print supplies that promote active, hands-on learning.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Rigorous Student Tasks:

The school regularly examines student work - what students are being asked to do on in their classrooms - across grades or courses in all content areas. Examining the texts and tasks students experience provides the necessary insight to gauge rigor and illuminate how the standards are actualized prompting the question whether or not approaches support the true spirit of college and career readiness. (adapted from The Education Trust – Equity in Motion Series)

Where to look for evidence

1. Assess to Grow Protocols
2. Learning Walks
3. Revised Scope & Sequenced
4. Cross-Department Learning (Eng & SS)

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Rigorous Student Tasks

  • Begin with the belief that all students can learn. (see Culture for Learning)
    • Convey high learning expectations for all students and develop structures that enable practice and perseverance for each individual student.
    • Create an environment where students assume responsibility for high-quality work by persevering, initiating improvements, addressing critiques, making revisions, adding detail and/or helping peers.
    • Communicate the necessity of attendance and engagement everyday in order to succeed.
  • Plan and assign tasks that are cognitively challenging for individual students and require students to provide evidence of their reasoning.
    • Align tasks with standards-based learning objectives that reflect the depth of knowledge expectations.
    • Tasks are Integrative to draw on multiple standards.
    • Teach for Robust Understanding in Mathematics (TRU Math). Engage students with important mathematical ideas, not simply receiving knowledge, requiring students to engage in productive struggle.
  • Tasks reflect the key shifts in literacy.
    • Complexity: Tasks reward close reading of complex text; Focus on comprehension of academic language, not obscure vocabulary.
    • Evidence: Cite evidence from text and write to sources, not decontextualized prompts.
    • Knowledge (non-fiction): Tasks embed reading and writing across disciplines with a variety of literary and informational complex texts and tasks and demonstrate comprehension through speaking, listening.
  • Tasks reflect the key shifts in mathematics.
    • Focus: Tasks reflect a curricular and instructional focus on the major work in (e.g. operational fluency and number sense in K-2).
    • Coherence: Multi-grade progressions stress key beginnings (e.g. ratios in 6th grade) and key end points (e.g. fluency with multiplication in 3rd);
    • Rigor: Problems require construction of mathematical reasoning and critiques of other possible solutions.
  • Provide opportunities for students to create authentic work for real audiences (beyond the teacher) to motivate them to meet standards and engage in critique and revision.
  • Examine student work to identify and showcase the qualities of strategic thinking that are both rich in content and relevant for students.
    • Analyze models with students to build a vision of quality.
    • Use protocols to collectively reflect regularly on the level of cognitive demand asked of students across the school, particularly priority group students, to think strategically as speakers, listeners, readers, and writers.
    • Analyze student work samples as part of professional learning to best support students’ attainment of quality work and standards.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Transitions, College & Career Access & Persistence:

The school creates pathways to success built on a vision in which all students leave secondary school with a clear plan for their initial postsecondary destination, whether in apprenticeship training, work, or college. All students have equal access to college preparatory curriculum to be successful.  The school is characterized by structures for developing early postsecondary awareness and the knowledge and skills that lay the foundation for the academic rigor and social development necessary for college and career success. Students are equipped with the confidence in their ability to implement and adapt their plan throughout their lives as they and the world around them change. This vision sees students as the architects of their own lives.(adapted from Creating Pathways to Success, Ontario)

Where to look for evidence

1. College visits
2. College and Career Lab and coach
3. Transition Fairs for DL students
4. College Possible
5. One Goal
6. Postsecondary Leadership Team
7. AP & DC Classes
8. Naviance
9. College persistence data
10. Summer STEM Start up
11. Former Students Speakers
12. Department Invited-Speakers
13. Scholarships and Internships

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Transitions, College & Career Access & Persistence

  • TRANSITIONS - Have structures and processes in place to ensure successful transitions (e.g. into school , grade to grade, school to school, school to post-secondary).
    • Mitigate the adverse effects experienced by some students in transition – such as arriving part-way through the school year – that can cause students to fall behind or become disengaged from school.
    • Monitor the progress of English learners after transition from services.
    • Provide programs and interventions that help students as they move from middle school through Freshmen year, including but not limited to:  High School Investigation Days, Freshmen Connection program (where budget allows), and a robust Freshmen Orientation program. Implement targeted holistic student supports the entire Freshmen year.
    • Provide sustained summer learning experiences to minimize learning loss and support key transition periods (e.g. summers before Kindergarten, HS, and college).
      • Use student data and best practices research to develop focused programs.
      • Expand access beyond students who are struggling academically.
      • Provide school counseling and postsecondary advising transition support and follow-up during “Summer Melt” and the first year of college.
    • AWARENESS - Expose students early to academic/professional worlds beyond K-12.
      • Provide students opportunities to discover personal talents and skills, identify career interests, and pursue coursework/activities necessary to reach personal, academic and career goals.
      • Expose students to a range of career paths and the educational requirements of each to improve long-term planning and goal-setting.
      • Start the conversation about college in primary grades.
      • Make parents aware of academic opportunities and supports for their child.
    • READINESS – Ensure equitable access to college preparatory curriculum.
      • Provide access to 8th Grade Algebra to all eligible 8th grade students.
      • Provide access to early college and career coursework and credential opportunities while in HS (e.g. AP credit, Dual credit, industry credentials (CTE), Seal of Biliteracy)
      • Teach students to analyze their transcripts and test scores, as well as connect course selection, attendance, and grades to their continued success and access to postsecondary options, and adjust their actions and behavior to make progress toward graduation and their top postsecondary choice. Provide support and motivation to encourage B’s or better and improving attendance.
      • Create opportunities for students to explore college and career knowledge, mindsets, and skills necessary for academic planning and goal setting.
      • Find opportunities to work with all students on academic and personal behaviors, including persistence, engagement, work habits/organization, communication/ collaboration, and self-regulation.
      • In Naviance, develop an Individual Learning Plan that tracks coursework, college and career assessments, goal setting, 6th-12th grade milestones completion that culminates in a concrete postsecondary plan.
    • SUCCESS - Provide direct assistance to all students and families through every stage of the college selection, application, and entry process (Transition to College (HS)) including, but not limited to academic planning/advising to assist with:
      • Selecting colleges with the best institutional graduation rates for their level of qualifications. (Students of all qualification levels are more likely to graduate from college if they attend a postsecondary institution with high graduation rates
      • Researching/comparing options including short and long-term financial outcomes, comparing college graduation rates, and other statistics to narrow down options.
      • Researching living wage options such as an apprenticeship or certification programs for students who wish to work after high school and/or want to delay college.
      • Applying to multiple colleges—generally three or more.
      • Navigating financial aid and capitalizing on grant and scholarship opportunities.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Expectations for depth & breadth of Quality Teaching (3 of 3 complete)     Expand all

Instruction:

The teachers have finely honed instructional skills. They can shift from one approach to another as the situation demands by carefully monitoring the effect of their teaching on student learning. They seamlessly incorporate ideas and concepts from other parts of the curriculum into their explanations and activities. Their questions probe student thinking and serve to extend understanding. They promote the emergence of self-directed learners.

Where to look for evidence

1. Final page of Assess to Grow | Step 5 Re-teaching Plan
2. Aggregate Data of CPS REACH components of domain 3
3. Learning Walk
4. Five Essentials for ambitious instruction, effective leaders, supportive environment
5. We have identified our TIA--critical thinking and reading
6. Project-based learning
7. Peer observations

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Instruction

  • Plan a range of effective pedagogical approaches suitable to student learning of the content/skills taught and anticipate student misconceptions.
  • Effectively communicate with students.
    • Guide students to articulate the relevance of the objective(s) to learning.
    • Anticipate possible student misunderstanding.
    • Enable students to develop a conceptual understanding of content while making connections to their interests, knowledge, and experience.
    • Enable students to contribute to extending the content by explaining concepts to their classmates.
    • Build on students' language development and understanding of content.
    • Use vocabulary appropriately for students' ages and development. Students contribute to the correct use of academic vocabulary.
  • Use questioning and discussion as techniques to deepen student understanding and challenge.
    • Use a variety of low- and high-level, open-ended, and developmentally appropriate questions to challenge students cognitively, advance high level thinking and discourse, and promote metacognition.
    • Use techniques that enable students to engage each other in authentic discussions about content. And, enable students to formulate their own questions and respectfully challenge one another using viable arguments based on evidence.
    • Encourage student responsibility for ensuring all voices are heard in the discourse and that all students are listening and responding to questions and answers from their teacher and peers.
    • Require students to cite textual evidence to support/develop a claim.
  • Engage students in learning.
    • Scaffold instruction to ensure all students, including diverse learners and English Learners, access complex texts and engage in complex tasks.
    • Provide targeted supports to individual students or groups of students based on their identified needs.
    • Provide instruction designed to develop language domains for English learners.
  • Monitor the effect of teaching on student learning and integrate formative assessment into instruction.
    • Monitor progress and check for understanding for individual students.
    • Change instructional practice based on analysis of current data.
    • Use universally designed assessments that allow for multiple pathways for students to demonstrate understanding of the objective(s.
    • Also see Balanced Assessment.
  • Persist in adjusting instruction so individual student misunderstandings or advanced needs are successfully accommodated.
    • Intervene in a timely and effective way to help students who are struggling.
    • When formative assessments show a need for intervention or enrichment, make effective impromptu adjustments that individualize instruction.
    • Use progress monitoring data to trace effectiveness of interventions and student response to intervention.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Multi-Tiered System of Support:

The school is characterized by full implementation a system of academic and social emotional (SEL) supports for all students. Every day, in all classrooms, all teachers provide: Universal instruction in the core curriculum - academic & SEL (Tier 1) to all students; additional targeted academic and SEL supports (Tier 2) where needed; and deep and intense supports (Tier 3) based on individual and small group needs. The school also monitors On Track data (grades/GPA and attendance (ES), and course credits (HS)) to provide interventions/supports for students at risk for failure and/or truancy.

Where to look for evidence

1. Freshman on-track team sponsors the FX (freshman study hall after school)
2. Advisory
3. Post-secondary learning team minutes
4. Attendance team minutes
5. Assess to Grow Protocol
6. Intervention Logs (Student Logger)
7. CARE team--meeting minutes, for referrals, CARE team tracker
8. Personal Learning Plan for students needing more support Some articulation of modified instruction in course team unit plans from ins, prep, and honors levels Freshman On-Track Student Chat Protocol Freshman On Track Parent Meeting Protocol Freshmen Mentee Survey Freshmen Needs Assessment Survey Tier One (what we do for all students): Building Respect and Rapport, Redirection (looks, comments, proximity), Restorative Conversations (SY15-16 focus: Restorative Conversation UCAN cycle, I Statements, and Body Language), Behavior Syllabus Structures, Advisory, Amends-making/Restitution
9. Tier Two (what we do for the roughly 15% of students who need more specific supports/consequences): Parent Conferences, Peace Circles and Peer Jury, Personalized Learning Plans, Anger Management Group, Trauma Group, Freshmen Tutoring, Academically-Focused Detention
10. Tier Three (what we do for the roughly 5% of students who need very intensive supports/consequences): Behavior/Academic Plans, Individual Counseling Supports, Restorative In-School Suspension, Out-of-School Suspension and Expulsion as needed.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Multi-Tiered System of Support

  • TIER 1 - Persist in adjusting instruction so individual student misunderstandings or advanced needs are successfully accommodated. (3e)
    • Intervene in a timely and effective way to help students who are struggling.
    • When formative assessments show a need for intervention or enrichment, teachers make effective impromptu adjustments that individualize instruction for students.
    • Use progress monitoring data to trace effectiveness of interventions and student response to intervention.
  • TIER 1 - Customize the learning environment, pace, and approach of teaching and curriculum in order to meet each learners’ individual needs (‘Personalized Learning’).
    • Empower student to advance their learning.
    • Use up-to-date individual student profiles that include strengths, needs, motivations, and outlines an individualized path to reach his/her goals.
    • Classrooms are student-centered with student agency.
    • Each student has the opportunity to advance upon demonstrating mastery.
  • ON TRACK - Provide universal supports to prevent failing and absenteeism and targeted interventions for grades below “C” or chronic absenteeism. (On Track)
    • Identify students off track due to low attendance and poor course performance and provide intensive supports to address root causes of why students have low grades and poor attendance.
  • TIER 2 & 3 - Collaborate and work as teams of teachers and Related Service Providers (RSP) to plan and monitor targeted student support with varied instructional strategies and SEL support of varying degrees of intensity for all students.
    • Monitor students requiring and receiving targeted and intensive instruction/interventions.
    • Use the Problem Solving Process to plan Tier 2 and 3 instruction/interventions.
    • Determine appropriate interventions for students or groups of students not making adequate progress.
    • Use progress monitoring data to track effectiveness of interventions and student response to intervention.
  • TIER 2 & 3 – Implement Personal Learning Plans (PLP) goals and intervention strategies for students requiring school year supports as described in Elementary School Promotion Policy (Board Report 09-1028-PO2). 
    • Ensure implementation of these plans, review subsequent 5 week data, determine the effectiveness of the strategies and adjust plans as needed.
  • Communicate to parents/guardians the additional supports and/or interventions provided for their child to better align school and home environments.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Balanced Assessment & Grading:

A balanced assessment system effectively measures the depth and breadth of student learning and monitors student progress towards college and career readiness. It also produces actionable data to inform planning for instruction, academic supports, and resource allocation. To meet these goals, a balanced assessment system must include multiple measures and be responsive to the needs of all students, including diverse learners and English learners.

Where to look for evidence

1. Assess to Grow Protocols Uploaded semester assessments for course teams
2. Units and lesson plans with formative and summative assessments
3. Average grades somewhat inflated for LV
4. 5 Essentials: Ambitious instruction data
5. CPS REACH data for 1c, 1e, 3d, 4a, and 4b
6. Assess to Grow - Step 4 | Growth Protocol (evidence of assessment data used in planning).
7. Lower ACT score when they leave than they should have
8. Lack of college/career readiness among many students
9. Performance Task BOY/MOY
10. Grading Categories
11. Grade Distribution Report
12. Foundational and stretch skills on Unit Plans
13. ACT | GPA Side-by-Side category

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Balanced Assessment & Grading

  • Use multiple measures (i.e. a range of assessment types and at multiple points in time) to supplement district-centralized assessments with other formative assessments to provide a more comprehensive picture of student learning.
  • Use screening, diagnostic, and progress monitoring assessment to correctly identify specific gaps and monitor improvement, especially for students receiving Tier 2 and 3 services, in addition to Tier 1 core instruction. (also see MTSS and Instruction)
  • Make assessments accessible to students, including diverse learners and English Learners through employing features of universal design and use of accommodations and, where needed, modifications.
    • Provide accommodations in presentation (i.e. how assessment text and tasks are presented to students), response (i.e. how students provide their answers), and/or setting/timing (i.e. scheduling/location of assessment).
  • Utilize assessments that reflect the key shifts in literacy and mathematics in teacher created or selected assessments. (see Rigorous Student Tasks)
  • Utilize assessments that measure the development of academic language for English learners.
  • Have access to and analyze school-wide, teacher team, and classroom assessment data to determine instructional effectiveness and subsequent learning needs
  • Improve and promote assessment literacy.
    • Work together on building common assessments within a department, course, or grade level team.
    • Invest resources in helping teachers evaluate and improve the quality of formative assessments. For example, use the Assessment Design Toolkit.
    • Use common protocols and calibrate on scoring and grading in teacher teams.
    • Analyze quality and alignment of assessments and tasks to ensure they meet the expectations of the standards and embed various levels of complexity.
  • Have a grading system that clearly, accurately, consistently, and fairly communicates learning progress and achievement to students, families, postsecondary institutions, and prospective employers.
    • Ensure that students, families, teachers, counselors, advisors, and support specialists have the detailed information they need to make important decisions about a student’s education.
    • Measure, report, and document student progress and proficiency:
      • Against a set of clearly defined cross-curricular and content-area standards and learning objectives collaboratively developed with staff.
      • Separately from work habits, character traits, and behaviors, so that educators, counselors, advisors, and support specialists can accurately determine the difference between learning needs and behavioral or work-habit needs. academic mindsets and behaviors (CCSR).
    • Ensure consistency and fairness in the assessment of learning, and assignment of scores and proficiency levels against the same learning standards, across students, teachers, assessments, learning experiences, content areas, and time.
    • Ensure grades are not used as a form of punishment, control, or compliance.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life (6 of 6 complete)     Expand all

Culture for Learning:

A culture for learning is characterized by a school atmosphere that reflects the educational importance of the work undertaken by both students and staff. It describes the norms that govern the interactions among individuals about the mindsets (e.g. ability/confidence to grow with effort), academic behaviors (e.g. attending classes, completing assignments), the learning strategies and skills, the value of perseverance despite challenges and obstacles, and the general tone of the school. The classroom is characterized by high cognitive energy, by a sense that what is happening there is important, and that it is essential to “get it right.” There are high expectations for all students. The classroom is a place where teachers and students value learning and hard work, and students take visible delight in accomplishing their work. Staff believe they can make a difference, that their hard work is the fundamental cause of student achievement, and are invested in student outcomes.

Where to look for evidence

1) school-wide shared mission statement of HOME that we discuss with our students (what does it look like, how do we demonstrate it, etc.) 2) Posters of I Statements and Body Language protocols for ease of staff use
3) Hand out student and faculty achievement awards to acknowledge and honor people
4) BAG/Paw Reports
5) Advisory lessons geared around culture of learning (executive functions, study skills, college readiness, etc.)
6) College related workshops, clubs, activities and expectations that circle back to the E of the school mission statement 7) When needed, REACH coaching to assist teachers in developing high expectations and ways to scaffold students up to meeting them 8) 5Essentials data - strong in Expectations for Post-Secondary Education: teachers expect most students to go to college

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Culture for Learning

  • Create a culture that reflects a shared belief in the importance of learning and hard work.
    • Use strategies to reinforce and cultivate student curiosity.
    • Make learning goals relevant to students, and inspire students to stay committed to their learning goals.
    • Consistently communicate the expectation that all students can achieve at high levels.
    • Utilize strategies to encourage daily and timely attendance.
  • Convey high learning expectations for all students and develop structures that enable practice and perseverance for each individual student.
    • Clearly display school-wide expectations for academic and personal success throughout the building.
    • Set high expectations according to grade-appropriate learning objectives.
    • Differentiate expectations so all students stretch to not only meet but exceed personal learning goals.
    • Recognize high levels of student achievement. All students receive recognition.
    • Encourage student resilience and hard work.
    • Ensure students feel safe to share misunderstandings and struggles.
  • Encourage students to take ownership and pride in their work where students assume responsibility for high-quality work by persevering, initiating improvements, addressing critiques, making revisions, adding detail and/or helping peers.
    • Students self-assess (e.g. checking own work before giving to teacher) to develop a reflective habit of mind essential for improvement. This ensures students take responsibility for their own learning, focuses attention on criteria for success, and increases effort and persistence.
  • Provide students frequent, informative feedback.
    • Tell/show students what they have done well (through positive reinforcement) and what they need to do to improve, including clarifying criteria and goals.
    • Give feedback on the task, the processes used to complete the task, and on the student’s ability to self-regulate their own learning.
  • Develop academic mindsets and behaviors.
    • Teach a growth mindset that over time with effort and practice, students can learn and succeed.
    • Encourage students’ sense of belonging to the school and classroom community (see Relational Trust).
    • Employ strategies including ongoing monitoring and support of students’ academic behaviors.
    • Praise effort and process. For example, “Good job, that must have taken a lot of effort” instead of, “Good job. You must be really smart.”

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Relational Trust:

The school is characterized by high levels of relational trust between all school participants - the “glue” or the essential element that coordinates and supports the processes essential to effective school improvement. Interactions, both between the teacher and students and among students, are highly respectful, reflecting genuine warmth and caring. Students contribute to high levels of civility. Interactions are sensitive to students as individuals, appropriate to the ages and development of individual students, and to the context of the class. The net result of interactions is that of academic and personal connections among students and adults.

Where to look for evidence

1) PD and surveys (Climate and Culture survey, etc.)
2) Attendance Team, FOT (mentees), FX tutoring program
3) Student Council
4) Restorative Culture building (Peace Circles, U Can Posters, I Statements, etc)
5) Individual teacher behavior syllabi and building norms based on trust and respect
6) Clubs to address student diversity (GSA, Black Student Union, etc)
7) 5Essentials - Neutral on Teacher-Teacher Trust, Strong on Student-Teacher Trust and Teacher-Principal Trust 8) Domain 2 REACH Data - Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport: 17% of staff distinguished, 71% proficient, 10% basic and 2% unsatisfactory

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Relational Trust

  • Develop trusting relationships with students so each student has at least one trusted adult in the school.
    • Adults are responsible for occasional check-ins or serve as mentors.
  • Adult-student interactions are positive, caring, and respectful.
    • Ensure a greater proportion of interactions are positive (as opposed to corrective) between staff and student consistently school-wide.
  • Student interactions are mutually supportive and respectful, with strong norms for positive behavior.
    • Create opportunities for students to build positive relationships with peers.
    • Create opportunities for older students to mentor younger students.
  • Understand diversity and its impact on student learning; recognize and integrate the learning opportunities that come from a diverse community.
    • Create opportunities for students to learn about the community they serve (e.g. culture and neighborhoods).
    • Have mutual respect for individual differences (e.g. gender, race, culture, etc.) at all levels of the school—student-student; adult-student; adult-adult and overall norms for tolerance.
    • Provide training to engage diverse families and communities.
  • Support and respect one another, personally and professionally (Teacher-Teacher Trust, Teacher-Principal Trust)
    • Respect other teachers who take the lead in school improvement efforts.
    • Respect colleagues who are experts at their craft.
    • Exchanges are marked by genuinely listening to what each person has to say and by taking these views into account in subsequent actions. Even when people disagree, individuals can still feel valued if others respect their opinions.
    • Personal regard springs from a collective willingness to extend beyond the formal requirements of a job definition or a union contract (e.g. openness or reaching out to others).
  • Utilize relationships as a means of deterring truant behavior brought on by unspoken hurdles a child may be facing.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Student Voice, Engagement, & Civic Life:

Students are interested and engaged in learning, invested in their school, and contributing to their community. The school provides early and ongoing exposure to a wide range of extracurricular activities and rigorous courses and programming.

Where to look for evidence

1. Many extracurricular clubs/sports/organizations
2. -AP/Dual-Credit courses (Numbers?)
3. Concerts
4. Blood Drives
5. Student Shadows
6. Holocaust Remembrance
7. Student Canvassing

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Student Voice, Engagement, & Civic Life

Students…

  • Have equitable access to a wide range of extracurricular and enrichment opportunities that build leadership, nurture talents and interests, and increase attendance and engagement with the school.
    • Student needs, interest, and input are solicited for student programming.
    • Impact and quality of extracurricular and enrichment activities are measured regularly.
  • Have equitable access to rigorous courses/programming (e.g. AP, IB, magnet, dual credit, CTE).
    • Student needs, interest, and input are solicited for student programming.
  • Have a choice.
    • Respectful student questioning and inquiry is embraced. Students choose issues of concern, research topics relevant to their lives, and develop their own plans to address them.
    • Learning activities are personalized to match students’ needs and interests, and students are involved in decisions that affect their learning.
  • Have a voice and take informed action.
    • Students are included in key conversations about their learning experience and work with the principal and staff to identify issues and implement solutions. (e.g. student voice committee).
    • Students initiate and lead some school improvement initiatives.
    • Students participate in democratic decision-making at the school level.
    • Students identify and research issues of relevance and work together to propose/advocate for solutions.
  • Connect to decision-makers.
    • Students learn about the structures and roles of government and civil society. They learn how to engage with elected officials and decision makers, and learn they have power and practice using it.
    • Students learn about issues and candidates, prepare voter education materials and get involved. 
    • All eligible students are asked to register to vote.
  • Make positive contributions to the school and community.
    • Civic engagement is the project of entire school. Teachers and school staff collaborate across disciplines and grade levels to align and embed civic skills and content in curriculum.
    • Curriculum based projects, including service learning experiences, are present in various disciplines, and link students to community resources and partners.
    • Incorporate writing for audience beyond the teacher (presentation based learning).
  • Learn to evaluate and consider multiple viewpoints by discussing current and controversial topics.
  • Consider how people in a democratic society effect change.
  • Consider their roles and responsibilities as a member of the community.
  • In high school, students are enrolled in Civics courses.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Safety & Order:

The school is characterized by high levels of safety and order. Students feel physically and emotionally safe from harm, and adults work to actively maintain a safe, orderly school environment.

Where to look for evidence

1. Teacher visibility in the hallway
2. Verify/Student Logger to record
3. Peace Circles
4. Peer Jury
5. Reviewing data and discuss with faculty
6. Behavioral syllabi and expectations
7. Volunteer Hall Sweepers
8. Volunteer Cafeteria Monitors
9. 5Essentials data: neutral in students feeling safe inside, around, and traveling to school, but four points higher than similar CPS schools (42 pts v. 38 pts)
10. 5Essentials data: teachers report that other teachers at Lake View help maintain discipline school-wide and not just in their classroom – nearly all teachers 30%, most 39%, about half 21%, some 9%, and none 1%.

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Safety & Order

  • Ensure students and adults feel physically, socially, intellectually, and emotionally safe throughout the school.
  • Provide clear procedures for reporting and responding to safety concerns.
  • Manage efficient and orderly transitions between activities.
    • Manage classroom routines and procedures to maximize instructional time.
    • Orchestrate the environment so students contribute to the management of classroom routines (e.g. transitions) without disruption of learning).
    • Arrival, dismissal, and other school-wide transitions are safe, efficient, and orderly.
  • Provide a framework for positive behavior throughout the school based on shared values and expectations.
    • Have shared expectations for positive behavior. (See Restorative Approaches to Discipline)
  • Teach, model, and reinforce (by all staff members) clear behavior expectations for all areas of the school.
    • All adults use active supervision (move, scan, and interact) in all settings.
  • Emphasize proactive, instructive, and restorative approaches to student behavior and minimize punitive consequences through policies and procedures. (See Restorative Approaches to Discipline)
    • Adults correct misbehavior in ways that reinforce established expectations and cause minimal disruption to learning.
  • Clarify criteria for office referrals versus classroom managed behavior.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Restorative Approaches to Discipline:

The school is characterized by having and implementing policies and procedures that emphasize proactive, instructive, and restorative approaches minimizing punitive consequences. Discipline practices primarily focus on shaping behavior as opposed to punishing behavior. The school only uses out-of-school suspension as a last resort and utilizes a systems-change approach to bring about a more restorative culture. The school is also characterized by strong and consistent school and classroom climates. The school reinforces positive behaviors and responds to misbehaviors in calm, respectful, and thoughtful ways, teaching students important social and emotional skills that enable them to get along with others, make responsible decisions, and focus on learning.  When misbehavior occurs, the school seeks to understand the underlying reasons (root cause) in order to design a response that effectively changes student behavior using a menu of instructive, corrective and restorative responses.

Where to look for evidence

1. Peace circles and training
2. Restorative Justice practices
3. Behavioral syllabi
4. Tiered responses/consequences
5. Behavior plans
6. Care Team
7. FOT Team

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Restorative Approaches to Discipline

  • PROACTIVE - Reinforce positive student behavior with clear expectations, routines, and procedures.
    • A team meets regularly to organize systems that support a restorative environment.
    • Post and refer to clear, positively stated expectations and model expected behaviors.
    • Create routines and procedures central to the learning environment.
    • Engage families as partners.
    • Contact families frequently to inform them of positive student behavior and progress.
    • Vary acknowledgements and provide both short and long term opportunities for reinforcement for all students.
  • INSTRUCTIVE - Integrate universal SEL skills instruction and core content.
    • Intentionally teach competencies outlined in SEL Standards. Use discipline as opportunity to teach these skills.
    • Use a Multi-tiered System of Supports (MTSS) for social, emotional, and behavioral growth.
      • Use data to determine which behaviors should be retaught or more heavily reinforced.
    • Explicitly teach expected behavior and positively reinforce consistently school-wide.
    • Avoid power struggles with students by offering choices. Redirect students privately and respectfully.
  • RESTORATIVE - Employ a continuum of responses to behavior to effectively change student behavior.
    • Ensure classroom instruction continues when problem behavior occurs.
    • Prefer responses that do not remove students from regular instructional setting or after school activities.
    • Respond to behavior to address the cause, reteach expectations, build social emotional skills, and repair relationships with staff or peers.
    • Designate an administrator, such as a dean or restorative practices coordinator, responsible for leading centrally-managed response to behaviors using consistent, restorative procedures.
    • Support teachers to engage in restorative conversations or respond to behavior incidents.
    • Provide opportunities for students to take responsibility for repairing harm caused by their actions.
    • Assign detention and ISS only for students who have a pattern of misbehavior and have not responded to non-exclusionary interventions, or when separation is a logical response to the behavior.
      • Include specific interventions to address social and emotional skill development, communicate with teachers to repair relationships, maintain classroom work, and connect to behavioral intervention services as necessary.
      • Establish a clear procedure for obtaining assignments from teachers to mitigate the impact of lost instruction for students assigned to ISS.
      • Designate space and consistent staff to support implementation of ISS.
    • (Optional) Develop a Behavioral Health Team to coordinate appropriate behavioral interventions.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Parent Partnership:

The school develops strong parent partnerships characterized by involving parents in the instructional program, messaging expectations, fostering a better connection between the school and home, and inspiring participation and high levels of collaboration with families. The school provides opportunities for families to volunteer, build its parent community, and support the school's operations through activities including but not limited to participation on parent councils (e.g. PACs, BACs and PLNs). There are high levels of communication between schools and families is mutual and two-way. Families have a way to voice concerns and schools address and respond to input.

Where to look for evidence

1. Parent Portal and phone calls
2. Mandatory Parent meetings for suspensions
3. Parent Advisory Committee
4. Veterans Day
5. FAFSA Parent Workshops
6. Newsletter and LV website
7. RCP
8. Open House events
9. Special student events (Concerts, Holocaust Remembrance Day)
10. Recruiting parent volunteerism; chaperones
11. Remind.com
12. Attendance and Care Teams

Score

Scoring guide

Guide for Parent Partnership

  • Establish a non-threatening, welcoming environment that is warm, inviting, and helpful.
  • Provide frequent, high quality, well publicized opportunities for families and community to participate in authentic and engaging activities in the school community (e.g. student performances/ exhibitions, literacy or math events).
  • Provide multiple opportunities for parents to ask questions, raise concerns, and give feedback.
    • Respond to families’ concerns and requests for information professionally and in a timely manner, providing resources and solutions to address the concerns.
  • Solicit the support and engagement of families as partners in the instructional program (e.g. volunteering, working at home with their child, involvement in class and school projects in and out of school, and parent workshops).
    • Host events for parents to share with other parents how home and school complement each other.
    • Share best practices around learning and development with parents to support students at home.
    • Inform parents of grade level standards and expectations and grading policies with a clear description of what meeting the standard looks like.
    • Inform parents of attendance expectations and the impact of attendance on a student’s trajectory.
    • Assist parents to volunteer in the school and/or participate on teams/committees.
    • Promote the use of Parent Portal and Parent University to connect and engage parents with school.
  • Frequently communicate with families about class and individual activities and individual student’s progress.
    • Regularly inform parents of their child’s progress across all relevant measures: attendance, discipline, academics, social-emotional learning, and health and wellness.
    • Send regular, positive, personalized communication from a staff member.
    • Use a variety of consistent communication methods (e.g. calls, text, newsletter, website, face to face) sensitive to cultural norms and needs.
  • Conduct intensive outreach to families in need of specialized support through home visits and collaboration with social services agencies.
    • School responses to student excessive absences and/or tardiness includes outreach to families.
  • Provide proactive communication (e.g. parent handbook and resources).
  • Partner equitably with parents speaking languages other than English.
    • Information is provided to parents in their native language.
    • Parent meetings scheduled with interpreters present to facilitate participation.

Evidence, Measures, and Standards



Score

Framework dimension and category

Area of focus = Not of focus

2
Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement: Professional Learning
2
Expectations for depth & breadth of Quality Teaching: Balanced Assessment & Grading
2
Expectations for depth & breadth of Quality Teaching: Instruction
2
Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning: Curriculum
2
Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning: Instructional Materials
2
Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning: Rigorous Student Tasks
2
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Parent Partnership
2
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Restorative Approaches to Discipline
2
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Safety & Order
2
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Student Voice, Engagement, & Civic Life
3
Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement: Aligned Resources
3
Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement: Instructional Leadership Team
3
Culture of & Structure for Continuous Improvement: Leadership & Collective Responsibility
3
Expectations for depth & breadth of Quality Teaching: Multi-Tiered System of Support
3
Expectations for depth & breadth of Student Learning: Transitions, College & Career Access & Persistence
3
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Culture for Learning
3
Expectations for Quality & Character of School Life: Relational Trust
2014-2015 Actual
2015-2016 Actual
2015-2016 SQRP Goal
2016-2017 SQRP Goal
2017-2018 SQRP Goal
My Voice, My School 5 Essentials Survey
National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
23.00
African-American National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
7.00
Hispanic National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
23.00
English Learner National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
Diverse Learner National School Growth Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
13.00
National School Attainment Percentile on the EXPLORE, PLAN and ACT Assessments
35.00
Freshmen On-Track Rate
Lake View's Freshmen On-Track rate at the end of semester 1 this year was 91% and we do not expect this rate to fall more than one percentage point by the end of the year. While last year our FOT was 94% at the end of semester 1 last year and fell to 84% by the end of the year, we now have an established FOT team that is meeting bi-weekly to review data and progress monitor supports. Due to the establishment of an FOT team, we expect to increase our rate another 2% the following year.
87.40
82.60
90.00
92.00
4-Year Cohort Graduation Rate
Utilizing Assess to Grow, establishing a TIA, and implementing a Powerful Instructional Practice will increase the vertical alignment and rigor in all classes. Additionally our school-wide attendance policy based on incentives and the ensure the proper SEL supports are in place will help us progress monitor students who may fall through the cracks. The establishment of an FOT team and the re-establishment of the Freshman Connection program coupled will help to ensure proper supports are in place in the transitional 9th grade year. Lastly the expectation that counselors will meet with their entire caseload individually at least twice a year will help to keep students on track beyond their freshmen year.
91.70
86.70
87.00
88.00
1-Year Dropout Rate
This year we implemented home visits that had to be discontinued due to budgetary constraints. These visits will return in SY16-17 as a way to engage students in parents in the educational process. Additionally, the SEL reasons students may not attend school are examined by the Care Team and students are offered supports in-school and within their communities. For students severely behind in credits, students meet will meet with a CPS SOAR coordinator to look into alternate schools to meet their specific graduation needs. Protocols are in place via the counseling department to ensure that students are informed of their academic options (Saturday school, night school, summer school, etc...)
0.30
3.40
3.20
2.00
College Enrollment Rate
We have a college career coach and established Post-Secondary Leadership team to progress monitor data for college and career. As part of our Senior Contract, all 12th grade students are required to apply to at least 3 colleges. We have also established differentiated advisory lessons designed to meet the college and career goals for each grade level.
67.60
68.40
71.00
70.00
College Persistence Rate
With the newly acquired Naviance Alumni Tracker, we can see where our students are going to college prior to data released by the clearing house. This will allow us to contact our students to see what post secondary options they selected and offer guidance accordingly. Additionally, we have established College and Career goals that encourage students to apply to match colleges, as well as differentiated advisory lessons designed to meet the college and career goals for each grade level.
76.80
78.90
81.00
75.00
Average Daily Attendance Rate
Attendance team was created to analyze data and develop incentives and supports to encourage high daily student attendance. The Care Team works with students not attending school for SEL reasons and provides them resources in-school and in their community. Advisory lessons teach the importance of timeliness and time management. A focus on rigorous and engaging instruction to ensure students are motivated to attend class. Data collection on Diverse Learner students to ensure supports are effective in encouraging regular attendance to school.
91.60
91.40
90.00
91.00

Custom metrics 1 of 1 complete

2014-2015 Actual
2015-2016 Actual
2015-2016 SQRP Goal
2016-2017 SQRP Goal
2017-2018 SQRP Goal
STEM Instructional Approach
As an Early College STEM School LVHS is focusing on authentic use of standards in curriculum and instruction by utilizing the Assess to Grow protocols, particularly course team/department growth on the Progress Monitoring Rubric (movement from Tier 3 to Tier 2, and/or Tier 2 to Tier 1.). Specific products of this work are Alignment of Curriculum to Assessment (TIER 3); Common Assessments, Scope & Sequence (TIER 2), Use of Reflection & Re-Teaching Plans (TIER 1).
0.00
0.00
67.00
100.00

Tags:
Assessment

Area(s) of focus:
1

Action step

Responsible

Timeframe

Status

schedule course team meetings
Department Leaders
Apr 1, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Assessment, Academic, Common core, Ngss

Continue taking staff feedback and providing aligned professional development to ensure everyone has a common understanding for collaboration and assess to grow expectations
Admin
Dept leaders
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jul 1, 2016
Completed

Assessment, Academic

Target "power" standards for vertical alignment
Departments
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Assessment, Academic, Common core, Ngss

Build out a horizontally-aligned curriculum map
Departments
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
Completed

Assessment, Academic, Common core, Ngss

Develop assessments with rubrics for each targeted standard
Course Teams
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
Behind

Assessment, Academic, Common core, Ngss

Analyze data from common assessments to develop reflection and reteaching plans
Course Teams and/or Departments
Jul 1, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Assessment, Academic, Common core, Ngss

Identify students early via NWEA, PSAT, and related scores; increase marketing to AP bound kids
Departments with Programmer
May 2, 2016 to
Aug 31, 2016
Behind

College Access and Persistence, Climate and Culture

Vertically align classes to ensure curriculum teaches students the skills they need for AP and DE/DC
Departments
May 9, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
Behind

College Access and Persistence, Climate and Culture

Attend AP Professional Development opportunities
Staff
May 2, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
Completed

College Access and Persistence, Climate and Culture

Utilize LVHS "Assess to Grow" Progress Monitoring Rubric to monitor improvement by Tiers
Administration with Department Leaders
Feb 22, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Assessment, Academic, Common core, Ngss

Tags:
ILT, Instruction, Academics

Area(s) of focus:
2, 1

Action step

Responsible

Timeframe

Status

Research Powerful Practices
ILT
Apr 11, 2016 to
Jun 27, 2016
On-Track

Instruction, Academic, Professional development

Conduct Learning Walks to gather data on current Lake View instruction to build common understanding of critical thinking and reading
Staff
Oct 22, 2015 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

ILT, Cycles of professional learning, Academics, Professional development

Arrive at a common understanding of critical thinking and reading and use it in determining the powerful practice
ILT
Sep 8, 2015 to
Jun 30, 2016
On-Track

ILT, Instruction, Academic

ILT development of activity to gain Staff Input on Powerful Practice
ILT
May 9, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

ILT, Instruction, Academics

Develop a Critical Thinker and Reader rubric so staff can identify evidence of student growth
ILT
May 10, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Professional Learning, ILT, Instruction, Academics

Progress monitor staff growth on 3b
Administration
Oct 3, 2016 to
May 26, 2017
Not started

Tags:
College Access and Persistence, Climate and Culture, Restorative approaches, Sel mtss

Area(s) of focus:
3

Action step

Responsible

Timeframe

Status

Provide Advisory Instruction for students using AVID strategies and aligned to ISBE SEL-standards OR Provide instruction in general Curriculum using AVID strategies and aligned to ISBE SEL-standards (Need evidence in Unit Plans) *if advisory not voted for
Staff
Sep 6, 2016 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

Climate and Culture, Sel mtss

Find or develop AVID-related PD for staff around teaching strategies and lesson ideas for student college and career readiness
Administration
Aug 31, 2016 to
Jun 26, 2017
Behind

Sel mtss, Advisory

Revise advisory curriculum to align to AVID strategies and lessons
Advisory Team and AP Sovell
Jul 1, 2016 to
Sep 2, 2016
Not started

Sel mtss, Care team

Continue meeting as a Care Team
Care Team
Sep 6, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Sel mtss, Care team

Care Team monitors data monthly looking for evidence of efficacy and places where interventions may need to be changed due to lack of success
Care Team
Jun 6, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Sel mtss, Care team

Create a video/testimonial that demonstrates Care Team successes to better engage students/families
Care Team, with selected students
Jun 20, 2016 to
Sep 2, 2016
Not started

Restorative approaches

Continue teaching all stakeholders about Restorative Practices (Restorative Conversations, Student Logger, Care Team, Circles, etc.) via website, announcements, advisory, staff PD, etc to engage all stakeholders
Students, Staff
Aug 29, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
On-Track

Behavior and Safety, Safety and order

Hallway expectations normed and modeled by staff
Staff
May 9, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
Behind

Behavior and Safety, Safety and order

Increased staff presence in cafeteria and hallways
Staff
May 9, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
Behind

Behavior and Safety, Safety and order

Voluntary hall sweep sign-up
Staff
May 9, 2016 to
Jun 30, 2017
Behind

Social emotional, Advisory

Vote to continue doing advisory
Staff
May 9, 2016 to
May 31, 2016
Not started

Social emotional, Advisory

Tags:
Attendance, Climate and Culture, Restorative approaches

Area(s) of focus:
3

Action step

Responsible

Timeframe

Status

Creating more parental involvement by having school nights (separate from report card pickup)
counseling/newsletter
Apr 11, 2016 to
Jun 26, 2017
Completed

Attendance, Parent engagement, Parent portal

Design automated phone calls home for attendance
Attendance Clerk
Mar 28, 2016 to
Apr 1, 2016
Completed

Attendance, Parent engagement

Design incentives according to students' wants as determined by surveys
Attendance Team
Jun 23, 2017 to
Jun 23, 2017
On-Track

Attendance, Student engagement

Create systems and protocols around involving parents/guardians for absent/tardy students (phone tree, etc.)
Administration, Staff
Jun 30, 2016 to
Sep 2, 2016
Completed

On-Track

schedule course team meetings"

Apr 01, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Department Leaders

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Meeting scheduled as planned.
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Completed

Continue taking staff feedback and providing aligned professional development to ensure everyone has a common understanding for collaboration and assess to grow expectations"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jul 01, 2016 - Admin Dept leaders

Status history

Completed

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Professional Development
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Target "power" standards for vertical alignment"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Departments

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
completed scope and sequence with rigor increasing through-out
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Completed

Build out a horizontally-aligned curriculum map"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Departments

Status history

Completed

May 04, 2017

Evidence
completed course team unit plans and scope and sequence
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Behind

Develop assessments with rubrics for each targeted standard"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Course Teams

Status history

Behind

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Problem
completed rubrics and common assessments
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Analyze data from common assessments to develop reflection and reteaching plans"

Jul 01, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Course Teams and/or Departments

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Creating formative assessment strategies among Department Instructional Leaders and frosh course teams to re-engage and reteach students, give students feedback on their learning, and provide feedback for reteaching.
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Behind

Identify students early via NWEA, PSAT, and related scores; increase marketing to AP bound kids"

May 02, 2016 to Aug 31, 2016 - Departments with Programmer

Status history

Behind

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Problem
More students ready and taking AP courses; PSAT scores for Sophomores 2016/17
Root Cause
Next steps
Behind

Vertically align classes to ensure curriculum teaches students the skills they need for AP and DE/DC"

May 09, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Departments

Status history

Behind

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Problem
Aligned Scope and Sequence documents; PSAT scores for Sophomores 2016/17
Root Cause
Next steps
Completed

Attend AP Professional Development opportunities"

May 02, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Staff

Status history

Completed

May 04, 2017

Evidence
An increase in AP Test Scores and DC success rate and students who are eligable to take DC
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Utilize LVHS "Assess to Grow" Progress Monitoring Rubric to monitor improvement by Tiers"

Feb 22, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Administration with Department Leaders

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Department improvement from Tier 3 to Tier 1
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Research Powerful Practices"

Apr 11, 2016 to Jun 27, 2016 - ILT

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
ILT agendas from Powerful Practice PDs
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Conduct Learning Walks to gather data on current Lake View instruction to build common understanding of critical thinking and reading"

Oct 22, 2015 to Jun 30, 2017 - Staff

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Learning walk materials and data
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Arrive at a common understanding of critical thinking and reading and use it in determining the powerful practice"

Sep 08, 2015 to Jun 30, 2016 - ILT

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
LVHS Guide to Critical Thinking and Reading
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

ILT development of activity to gain Staff Input on Powerful Practice"

May 09, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - ILT

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Staff Survey on Powerful Practice and TIA
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Develop a Critical Thinker and Reader rubric so staff can identify evidence of student growth"

May 10, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - ILT

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Rubric, Course Team and Department data aligned to Rubric
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Not started

Progress monitor staff growth on 3b"

Oct 03, 2016 to May 26, 2017 - Administration

Status history

Not started

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Staff growing on domain 3b
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Provide Advisory Instruction for students using AVID strategies and aligned to ISBE SEL-standards OR Provide instruction in general Curriculum using AVID strategies and aligned to ISBE SEL-standards (Need evidence in Unit Plans) *if advisory not voted for"

Sep 06, 2016 to Jun 23, 2017 - Staff

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Advisory curriculum OR unit plan incorporating AVID strategies and lessons on SEL
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Behind

Find or develop AVID-related PD for staff around teaching strategies and lesson ideas for student college and career readiness"

Aug 31, 2016 to Jun 26, 2017 - Administration

Status history

Behind

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Problem
AVID-aligned professional development opportunities
Root Cause
Next steps
Not started

Revise advisory curriculum to align to AVID strategies and lessons"

Jul 01, 2016 to Sep 02, 2016 - Advisory Team and AP Sovell

Status history

Not started

May 04, 2017

Evidence
a revised advisory curriculum incorporating AVID strategies and lessons
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Continue meeting as a Care Team"

Sep 06, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Care Team

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
100s of referrals; somes students are referred and accept services
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Care Team monitors data monthly looking for evidence of efficacy and places where interventions may need to be changed due to lack of success"

Jun 06, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Care Team

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Increased attendance and/or grades, decreased behavior misconducts for students receiving services
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Not started

Create a video/testimonial that demonstrates Care Team successes to better engage students/families"

Jun 20, 2016 to Sep 02, 2016 - Care Team, with selected students

Status history

Not started

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Increased follow-through with students and families when given referrals and resources
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Continue teaching all stakeholders about Restorative Practices (Restorative Conversations, Student Logger, Care Team, Circles, etc.) via website, announcements, advisory, staff PD, etc to engage all stakeholders"

Aug 29, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Students, Staff

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
More students and staff participating in Restorative Conversations, Peace Circle, Peer Jury, and thus learning conflict resolution skills. Decreased behavior misconducts as evidenced in Dashboard; increased safety as measured by 5Essentials.
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Behind

Hallway expectations normed and modeled by staff"

May 09, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Staff

Status history

Behind

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Problem
Expectations posted; decreased behavior misconducts as evidenced in Dashboard; increased safety as measured by 5Essentials
Root Cause
Next steps
Behind

Increased staff presence in cafeteria and hallways"

May 09, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Staff

Status history

Behind

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Problem
Increased safety as measured by 5Essentials
Root Cause
Next steps
Behind

Voluntary hall sweep sign-up"

May 09, 2016 to Jun 30, 2017 - Staff

Status history

Behind

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Problem
Schedule designed; increased safety as measured by 5Essentials
Root Cause
Next steps
Not started

Vote to continue doing advisory"

May 09, 2016 to May 31, 2016 - Staff

Status history

Not started

May 04, 2017

Evidence
An advisory where social-emotional skills are taught
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Completed

Creating more parental involvement by having school nights (separate from report card pickup)"

Apr 11, 2016 to Jun 26, 2017 - counseling/newsletter

Status history

Completed

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Level of parent attendance, number of parents on Parent Portal increasing
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Completed

Design automated phone calls home for attendance"

Mar 28, 2016 to Apr 01, 2016 - Attendance Clerk

Status history

Completed

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Progress Monitoring of Automated Calls; increase of whole-school attendance to 91%
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
On-Track

Design incentives according to students' wants as determined by surveys"

Jun 23, 2017 to Jun 23, 2017 - Attendance Team

Status history

On-Track

May 04, 2017

Evidence
A multitude of incentives; increase of whole-school attendance to 91%
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps
Completed

Create systems and protocols around involving parents/guardians for absent/tardy students (phone tree, etc.)"

Jun 30, 2016 to Sep 02, 2016 - Administration, Staff

Status history

Completed

May 04, 2017

Evidence
Increase in parent-school contact as seen in Student Logger; increase in whole-school attendance to 91%
Problem
Root Cause
Next steps

Supplemental General State Aid(SGSA)

By checking the above box, the school is verifying that the attendance center complies with the statement regarding the use of SGSA funds:

  1. The attendance center allocation is correctly based on the number of students eligible to receive free and reduced lunch and breakfast.
  2. The attendance center has an approced plan, developed in consultation with teachers, administrators, and other appropriate personnel, and parents of thes tudents attending the attendance center.
  3. The attendance center's plan is approved by the LSC and CPS.
  4. SGSA funded activities fall within the allowable program categories: early childhood education, reduced class size, enrichment programs, remedial assistance, attendance improvement, and other educationally beneficial expenditures which supplement the regular programs as determined by the illinois state board of education.
  5. SGSA Funds supplement and do not suppland non-categorical and other categorical funds allocated to the attendance center.
  6. SGSA funds are supporting only those activities specified in the school's approved plan/amendment.
  7. SGSA funds are not used for capital expenditures. 8. SGSA funds are not used for any political or lobbying activities by the attendance center.

NCLB Program

(Not available to schools receiving NCLB funds for the first time) [Title 1/SW].

The school annually reviews the schoolwide plan/program. The schoolwide program plan is available to CPS, parents, and the public, and the information in the plan is in an understandable and uniform format, and to the extent practicable in a language the parents can understand.

Title I funded staff participate in the school's general professional development and school planning activities. Title I funded staff assume limited duties that are assigned to similar personnel including duties beyond the classroom, or that do not benefit Title I students, as long as the amount of time spent on such duties is the same proportion of the total work time with respect to similar staff.

NCLB Schoolwide Program

The Instructional Leadership Team has engaged staff in an analysis of LVHS in the areas of curriculum and student achievement; future focus will involve review of needs assessments in areas of SEL with the CARE Team, as well as learning walks and the refinement of a TIA and Professional Learning Cycle with the ILT.
Student programming will involve data-driven placement of students with semester reviews and course recommendations to promote linear movement of students from course to course, particularly Regular-Honors and Honors-Dual Credit-AP. Students will eventually experience interdisciplinary learning opportunities as a result of a school-wide Targeted Instructional Area.
LVHS has adopted and structured teams for FOT, PLT, ILT, Attendance, and Culture & Climate for SY2016-2017 with targeted data-led initiatives in each team and disaggregated by priority groups.
LVHS will adopt a FOT Team by utilizing common planning time or extended day payments for Freshmen teachers - providing data-analysis, mentoring, college and career awareness, and overall student support. LVHS will priortize FOT and grade level teams LVHS in common planning meetings for staff, as well as the continued used of the "College and Career Lab."
Posting on website and staff-wide of positions, consistent hiring protocol with phases of performance to ensure high-quality candidates, and identification of leadership opportunities for staff at BOY, MOY, and EOY to build capacity and create a guiding coalition of various teacher/staff leaders.
At the school level, ongoing PD will be provided during the school day with a structured, Professional Learning Plan in place before the school year begins. The parent advisory council and LSC will continue to receive in-services on educational initiatives at LVHS. CARE team training has continued with counselors receiving training on SEL supports, as well as additional CPS-provided PD related to transcript review processes. The teacher/staff-led ILT will continue to engage staff members in PD during staff collaborative time focused on instruction.
The PAC will host parent meetings; the school will advertise, encourage, and support pre-orientation for all grade levels; and the school will develop a streamlined calendar system to advertise and communicate calendar events through the website, social media, and LVHS Partners 5013.
n/a
PD will be organized with a focus on curriculum alignment to CCSS and interdisciplinary opportunities for incorporation of STEM school-wide. The ILT will continue to design and lead a Professional Learning Cycle involving structured Peer Observations, Instructional Rounds, School-wide Learning Walks, as well as an analysis of grading practices and common assessments school-wide.
Students off-track will be identified for additional support with Freshmen-level students experiencing one-on-one mentoring and ongoing review of on-track as well as SEL data review (including attendance). Advisories or extended division periods will allow for sharing of BAG Reports (Behavior, Attendance, Grades) and progress-monitoring by teachers and students.
Multiple external partners exist, such as Erie Health Center, Alternatives, YOW, and other SEL support from ODLSS and CPS PD opportunities with the case manager identifying resources at the city and state level to assist all our students and their transition-to-life goals, particularly Diverse Learners.

NCLB Targeted Assistance Program

  1. Eligible children have been identified by the school as failing, or most at risk of failing to meet the state's students academic achievement standards on the basis of multiple, educationally related, objective criteria.
  2. Children from pre-school through grade two have been selected solely on the basis of such criteria as teacher judgment, parent interviews, and developmentally appropriate measures.

Parent Involvement in Targeted Assistance and Schoolwide Programs

No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 continues a legislative commitment to parental involvement. Central features of prior reauthorizations, such as school-parent compacts, parent involvement policies, and the parent involvement funding formula remain unaltered. However, the NCLB reauthorization represents a notable shift in the role of parental involvement in the schools. It includes new provisions increasing parental notification requirements, parental selection of educational options, and parental involvement in governance. It envisions parents as informed and empowered decision makers in their children's education.

The administration will meet with the PAC chairs to develop the NCLB/Title I School Parental Involvement Plan and Policy. We will revisit and revise the plan as needed at the PAC meetings.
The parents will draft a meeting schedule during the Summer/Start of School 2017. The Title 1 Annual Meeting is scheduled for September 28, 2017 at 6:00pm. The Title 1 PAC Organizational Meeting is scheduled for September 28, 2017 at 6:30pm. Other meetings are scheduled at 6pm on the following dates: 10/26/17, 12/12/2017, 1/19/2018, 2/13/2018, 3/13/2018, 4/10/2018, 5/8/2018, 6/12/2018.
The parents will be notified about the Title I program via the school's website, phone all-call, and the information displayed on the electronic marquee.
After meetings, administration will meet with PAC chairs to discuss suggestions and the concerns of parents. Concerns will be addressed at subsequent PAC meetings or any communication beforehand.
Provide PARCC score reports to students to take home to parent/guardian. A copy of student test results will be given to each student and the school will provide an additional copy for the parents at report card pick-up.
The state will notify the parents of all teachers that are highly qualified; parents may also contact the Illinois StateBoard of Education regarding such information.
The administration and counselors will hold several parent information meetings regarding "Back-to-School," Parent Portal access and College Credit opportunities, ACT Parent Night, AP Fair, and a host of additional marketing events to capture the community's attention and broadcast the world of STEM at Lake View.
Multiple Parent Portal workshops have been conducted to help parents progress monitor their students' attendance and grades. Robo-calls and print documents are also sent to parents phones and homes regarding resources, etc. Example: ACT tutoring, FAFSA workshops. Ongoing training will be proposed to PAC for Spanish-speaking parents to strengthen English comprehension as well as speaking skills.
AP Sovell met with English to begin the brainstorming of how to best work and build ties with parents. The ideas generated during this meeting were aligned to best practices as defined in the CPS REACH Framework for Teaching, and then turned into a Google doc and shared with all staff to generate more ideas. Lastly, it was finalized as Lake View High School Parent Involvement Best Practices document. Staff will provide professional development on how to build and strengthen relationships with parents, as well.
n/a
Robocalls in English and Spanish alongside website postings, physical mailings, direct targeted phone calls and postings on the school's electronic sign are all utilized. Up-to-date information will be provided on email blasts, the school's website, twitter posts, marquee sign, phone all-call messaging, and letters sent home.

Policy Implementation Activities

n/a
Lake View High School fosters honor, ownership, mastery, and education through learning opportunities for all students in preparation for college, career, and community commitment.
The school will have parent-teacher conferences twice in 2016-2017; parents will have the opportunity to discuss their child's progress and the teachers will provide the parents with instructional strategies to assist the child at home.
Progress reports will be sent home weeks 5, 15, 25, and 35. Parents will also be able to check grades in parent portal on a weekly basis with regularly updated grades from teachers.
Parents will be able to contact the staff via phone and email. The staff will be available to conference with parents before and after school and during prep periods.
Parents are welcome to volunteer. We require parents to complete the Chicago Public Schools Volunteer Registration Packet, which will be made available on the school website.
Parents can monitor their children's attendance and grade via Parent Portal and FOT parent meetings.
During programming, parents and students will have the opportunity to provide input in selecting courses.Students are encouraged to form study groups, attend tutoring sessions, and meet with their teachers to discuss progress.
Students are encouraged to form study groups, attend tutoring sessions, and meet with their teachers to discuss progress.
Increase parent understanding of school selectivity and match through parent workshops aimed at precollege and postsecondary.
Increase parent involvement with students' relationship behavior by providing parent workshops through Between Friends.

Allocate your Mandated Title 1 Parent Involvement Funds to support your Parent Involvement Program.

Account(s)
Description
Allocation

51130, 52130
Teacher Presenter/ESP Extended Day
For Teacher presenter, ESP Extended Day, please remember to put money on the benefits line. Non-Instructional pay rate applies.
$
.00

53405
Supplies
In addition to supplies for parent program, please use this account to also purchase books for parents only. Use this account for equipment with a per unit cost of less than $500.
$
.00

53205
Refreshments
Allocation CAN NOT EXCEED 25% of the Parent Budget. Refreshments must be used for Title 1 PAC meetings, trainings and workshops.
$
.00

54125
Consultants
For Parent Training Only. Consultant must have a CPS vendor number and paid with a Purchase Order after service is rendered (NO CHECKS ARE ALLOWED)
$
.00

54505
Admission and Registration Fees, Subscriptions and memberships
For Parents use only.
$
.00

54205
Travel
Buses for Parents use. Overnight Conference travel- schoolsmust follow the CPS Tracel Policy. The CPS Parent Overnight Travel Approval Form and Conference Travel Form must be completed.
$
.00

54565
Reimbursements
Allocation CAN NOT EXCEED 25% OF THE Parent Budget. All Parent Reimbursements related to Title 1 Parent Involvement must be paid from this account. Receipts must be clear unaltered and itemized. School must keep all receipts.
$
.00

53510
Postage
Must be used for parent involvement programs only.
$
.00

53306
Software
Must be educational and for parent use only.
$
.00

55005
Furniture and Equipment
Must have a parent room or a secure place to keep furniture/equipment. Cannot be placed in the main office or where staff and students have access too. To by used only by parents.
$
.00

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